The countries and territories yet to report any COVID-19 cases

Despite infecting more than three million people around the world, there are still 34 countries and territories that have yet to report a single case of the novel coronavirus.

The countries and territories yet to report any COVID-19 cases

Despite infecting more than three million people around the world, there are still 34 countries and territories that have yet to report a single case of the novel coronavirus.

These include Comoros, Lesotho, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and tiny far-flung island nations in the Pacific such as Nauru, Kiribati and the Solomon Islands.

As of April 20, 213 countries and territories of the 247 recognised by the United Nations have seen at least one case of the COVID-19.

Of these, 186 have also experienced local transmission -- where the virus has spread within the community. There have been deaths in at least 162 of them.

Just because a nation has not reported an infection does not necessarily mean there have been no cases.

For example, North Korea has not reported any coronavirus cases but it is bordered by China, Russia and South Korea, all countries dealing with a high number of cases, meaning the virus may well have made it into the secretive state.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un reads a letter from U.S. President Donald Trump.

Some trends can be seen by looking at the spread of the coronavirus by regions. Asia experienced roughly two broad waves of transmission across borders, while in Europe, many countries started to report cases in the week from late February.

Latin America and Africa looked to be virus-free for January and February before the coronavirus spread rapidly through both continents.

Five countries and territories have managed to rid themselves of the virus after reporting cases. These are Anguilla, Greenland, the Caribbean islands of St. Barts and Saint Lucia, and Yemen.

None has reported deaths or state any currently active infections, with previous cases having fully recovered.

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You can also get up-to-date information from the Federal Government's Coronavirus Australia app, available on the , and the .

Source : 9 News More   

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Half a million debit cards to be issued to bank customers to help them shop online

Vulnerable customers such as the elderly will be issued with a debit card to help them shop online and make tap and go purchases during COVID-19.

Half a million debit cards to be issued to bank customers to help them shop online

More than half a million debit cards are being issued to bank customers around Australia to help them shop online or use contactless transactions during the coronavirus pandemic.

Fast-tracked by financial watchdog ASIC, the rollout of cards will be made to Australian Banking Association and Customer Owned Banking Association members who do not currently have a card.

It's expected many of the recipients are the elderly who have traditionally relied on cash, and opened bank accounts before debit cards were a standard feature.

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The fast-tracking of cards will allow recipients to shop online or over the phone, as well as use tap-and-go payments to access services in the community who have stopped using cash to minimise physical handling.

There is no requirement for the cards to be activated or used, and being a debit system recipients will not incur debt like they would with a credit card.

Ian Yates, Chief Executive of the Council on Ageing (COTA), said the initiative will alleviate some of the concerns shared by Australia's ageing population.

"COTA has received many calls during the COVID-19 period expressing concern that people struggled to purchase essential goods and services because some retailers stopped accepting cash," Mr Yates said.

"COTA Australia thanks COBA and its member banks for stepping up to provide a rapid response for their older customers, and ASIC for flexibly permitting this to happen."

Despite the reluctance on businesses to use cash, there has been relatively little evidence that cash increases the risk of transmission of COVID-19.

Businesses are legally allowed to dictate the payment terms required by customers, as long as requirements such as EFTPOS only are made clear before the transaction has begun.

For breaking news alerts and livestreams straight to your smartphone sign up to the and set notifications to on at the or

You can also get up-to-date information from the Federal Government's Coronavirus Australia app, available on the , and the .

Source : 9 News More   

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