The era of the flexi quaddie

Usually I listen to, rather than watch, the races on a Saturday afternoon, discreetly using vital outdoor tasks like cleaning the gutters or pulling weeds as cover for my clandestine activities. Mrs Lighthouse is fortunately completely unaware of my cunning strategy, so if anyone reading this knows her, don’t say anything. I’m sure you’d hate […]

The era of the flexi quaddie

Usually I listen to, rather than watch, the races on a Saturday afternoon, discreetly using vital outdoor tasks like cleaning the gutters or pulling weeds as cover for my clandestine activities.

Mrs Lighthouse is fortunately completely unaware of my cunning strategy, so if anyone reading this knows her, don’t say anything. I’m sure you’d hate to see the weeds at the Lighthouse ranch get out of control.

Every week I’m impressed by how good the tipsters are on the radio. A week doesn’t go by where someone somewhere among their pundits is declared, as they cross the line in the last leg, to have got the quaddie.

This seemingly impressive strike rate got me contemplating how investing in the quaddie has changed over the year.

Long ago in the wanton days of my youth, when the TAB was still known to many as the Lucky Shop, and before the sharpest minds in the land had invented flexi-betting, having a crack at the quaddie was a decision not to be entered into lightly.

Quite simply to even take three horses in each leg (81 combinations) cost a battling student over $40 based on the then minimum unit investment of 50 cents. In my case this was a week’s beer money so the inclusion of a shot in the dark 25/1 chance in your top three was a risk rarely taken.

(PAUL CROCK/AFP/Getty Images)

The 21st century has brought many advances to our daily lives. In 2020 a family man can have a punt and watch a race on his phone while half way up a ladder, although in the event of a close finish it’s always wise to remember where you are.

But no advance has done more to change the course of recent human history than flexi-betting. While it may seem like it has been around forever, the concept was only introduced into my home state of Victoria in 2006, admittedly some years behind NSW.

This innovation has given today’s battling student the opportunity to have both a pint and a punt with his $40 if he so chooses, or you can spend all $40 (or less) on the quaddie, but include many more combinations.

The tradeoff of course is that when you do get the quaddie, you are likely only getting a fraction of the declared dividend, although with more horses included, you should – like the radio tipsters – be able to strut around claiming that you have landed the quaddie more often.

And while 100 per cent of the dividend would be great, even getting a small clip can provide great satisfaction. Sometimes just being a winner is more than enough, even if it’s taken you 400 combinations to crack it!

One of the most pleasing days of my fluctuating punting career was picking up five per cent of a $27,000 quaddie for a $20 outlay at Rosehill about ten years ago. And that was with the faves winning the last two legs. I would never have got that one pre-flexi!

At the end of the day though, even with five in each leg, the quaddie can still be a challenge. The mysteries of life are many, but I doubt the day will ever come when I understand how Austin Raider could have won the final leg at Morphettville last week.

Source : The Roar Horse Racing More   

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Sydney racing selections: Rosehill tips for Saturday, 12 September

What a great start to spring! Last week’s winnings mean there’s some breathing room in my yearly tally. I’m hoping to extend that this Saturday with a good day at Rosehill and a couple of nice types at Flemington. Fifteen units worked last Saturday. I’ll stick at that this week. Units bet: 317 Units won: […]

Sydney racing selections: Rosehill tips for Saturday, 12 September

What a great start to spring!

Last week’s winnings mean there’s some breathing room in my yearly tally. I’m hoping to extend that this Saturday with a good day at Rosehill and a couple of nice types at Flemington. Fifteen units worked last Saturday. I’ll stick at that this week.

Units bet: 317
Units won: 352.30
Stats are based on one unit being equal to a $1 win bet New South Wales dividends. See the comments for any changes based on scratchings or track condition.

Sydney selections

Race 3 – 3 Yonkers (one unit)
It is a strong push to start the day with Yonkers. I loved his effort late when first-up in better grade. The horse is straight out to a more suitable distance and the added weight for stepping down a level is negated by – that’s right – Louise Day. He prefers good tracks. Hopefully we’re in that range on Saturday. The only reason I haven’t gone harder is Badoosh. He missed the kick last time (with my money on) and is primed for this.

Race 4 – 3 Rare Episode (one unit)
Yep, Louise Day again. This week’s speculator is Rare Episode. He’s massive overs first-up, the drier track works, the 1100 metres is his best trip, and he shapes to sit outside the leader here without pressure. The three-kilo apprentice claim seals the deal. His form in January stands up. Masked Crusader is definitely short enough. I can’t take him at odds-on but he’s probably the one looking at a big spring.

Race 5 – 9 Yardstick (one unit)
This is another one I’ve had a nibble at before (he let me down). He’s ready to go at 1500 metres, gets a dry surface for the first time and has been training the house down. It is an interesting race. Love Tap won by a big margin at Goulburn. Mo’unga should run well. Overlord can run well if he starts with them.

Race 6 – 1 Farnan (three units)
I’m looking at these early three-year-old races like a boxing series. Farnan is the champ, he holds all the belts. Until someone gets past him, I’ll stick with him – even at the short price. Rothfire creates interest, particularly in terms of a possible speed battle with the favourite. If another horse comes out of the box they can potentially nab an Everest spot. That’s a big carrot. I’m sticking solid (for now).

Race 7 – 3 Special Reward (one unit)
Another horse I’m very keen on, Special Reward is a ripper (eight from 15). He’s helped by the dry track, the step to 1300 metres is a tick and the horse runs well second-up. The horse is very well placed. My main worry is Signore Fox. He won the Ramornie when Snowden tipped the other horse he had in the race. He’s obviously a bit hard to catch, but six of his eight wins are on dry tracks and he’s nicely in carrying 53 kilos. Ranier is another horse in the race with a great winning record, as is Funstar (although she’ll win without me), as well as Riodini, who sneaks in down the bottom. After coming across the ditch to Waterhouse/Bott, he may find this too short but I’m watching very closely.

(Photo by Mark Evans/Getty Images)

Race 8 – 7 Sweet Deal (one unit)
Sweet Deal was very impressive fresh, winning at Randwick. She’s helped if she gets a dry track and I’m with her to go on with things, even with barrier 19. Fasika? Going back to the boxing stuff, she doesn’t have the belts yet, but has been impressive. She’s on show here for an Everest slot so will be wound up. Adelong will be doing well to turn the tables on Sweet Deal but the gate situation is reversed here, and I give Jen Rules a sneaky chance.

Race 9 – 11 Cisco Bay (one unit)
It is an interesting situation to finish off with my two top-raters. Cisco Bay has been good in two runs back from a break, is five from nine on slow and none from 14 on good surfaces (although with seven placings). I’ll be with him regardless but a soft five would make me happy. He has a nifty little new gear change with a nose roll going on. I like it. Amitto, on the other hand, hasn’t won on slow but has good track wins. Both horses are at nice prices. I’m with Cisco Bay for now and likely wide in the quaddie anyway (Orcein, Entente, Academy, Papal Warrior…).

Melbourne selections

Race 1 – 5 Sweet Thomas (one unit)
This horse was scratched last week and I tipped him. I’m sticking with him here. There is a nice weight drop from his Sydney win and this distance and Flemington probably suits better than the Valley anyway.

Race 3 – 2 Savatiano (two units)
Another short one, she’s back to her best and can go on with it second-up against this lot.

Race 4 – 7 Bold Star (one unit)
Bold Star flew home fresh, has good Flemington form, is unbeaten second-up and gets a great weight drop. Yes.

Race 7 – 4 Fierce Impact (two units)
Matthew Smith – who also trains Sweet Thomas – isn’t here for a holiday. He brings his champ for the feature race. Fierce Impact won an easy little trial after a great fresh run, that run, his Orr Stakes run, the All Star mile effort, or his Cantala win last year on Derby Day put him front and centre here. Russian Camelot is the boom horse. I’m one of the doubters. He goes right up my pecking order with a win.

What a day! Good luck everyone, thanks for your comments last week, stay safe and send through your best.

Source : The Roar Horse Racing More   

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