The Flash Is Finally Doing A Comic Accurate Version Of Season 3's Savitar

Through Godspeed, The Flash seems ready to present a comics-accurate version of the villain Savitar, whose name was used for season 3's villain.

The Flash Is Finally Doing A Comic Accurate Version Of Season 3's Savitar

Warning: The following contains SPOILERS for The Flash, season 6, episode 18, "Pay The Piper."

seems to be setting up a comics-accurate version of the classic villain Savitar for season 7. The show previously introduced a villain called Savitar during season 3, but he had nothing in common with the original character apart from being an evil speedster.

Savitar first appeared in The Flash #108 in December 1995, though several issues would pass before his origins were revealed. Savitar had been a test-pilot for an unnamed third world nation at the height of the Cold War, whose supersonic jet was struck by lightning while he was breaking the sound barrier. This gave him a connection to the Speed Force, just like Barry Allen, and he took the name of the Hindu god of all which is mobile. Savitar devoted his life to studying the Speed Force, developing powers which no other speedster had, such as draining the kinetic energy from objects in motion to boost his own velocity. In time he attracted followers, with whom Savitar shared his power even as he drained the Speed Force from those speedsters who would not acknowledge his supremacy.

Related: The Flash: Every Speedster That Exists In The Arrowverse

The penultimate episode of The Flash Season 6, "Pay The Piper," seemed to establish that the character of Godspeed was connected to a similar figure as the comic books' Savitar. Earlier in the season, it was revealed that Team Flash had encountered four speedsters who wore the costume of Godspeed, but who had no intelligence of their own and spoke in electronic beeps. A fifth Godspeed appeared in "Pay The Piper," who made reference to a group that wanted The Flash's powers, saying "We deserve your speed." He also spoke of having been sent after Barry Allen by one who wished to attain ultimate velocity. Couple this with Godspeed displaying a power no other speedster had utilized before, and the comparison to the original version of Savitar seems clear.

While introduced a character called Savitar as the chief villain of season 3, all he shared with the comic book character was his name and delusions of grandeur. Dubbing himself "The God of Speed," this Savitar was ultimately revealed to be a time remnant of Barry Allen from an alternate future where the real Barry Allen had become trapped in the Speed Force following his final battle with Zoom. Shunned and rejected by Team Flash, this Barry Allen devoted himself to making his past self suffer as he had, ultimately securing his own dark future by killing Iris West.

While it isn't clear if Godspeed is merely connected to a character like the comic book version of' Savitar, or if Savitar might be one of Team Flash's old enemies who was brought back to life by Crisis on Infinite Earths, the idea of a cult of speedsters dedicated to destroying The Flash is an interesting one. While the show has had no trouble with adapting the mythology of the comics in the past, this is one instance in which a strict adherence to the original concept might have been preferred. In any case, it is clear that Barry Allen will be facing some new enemy in season 7, but what name and face they will wear is anybody's guess.

More: Flash Theory: Why Atlantis Is Important To Arrowverse’s Future

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Netflix's Hollywood: Why The Famous Sign Says 'Hollywoodland' 

Ryan Murphy's Netflix miniseries features the Hollywood sign prominently throughout. Here's why it reads 'Hollywoodland' in the streaming show.

Netflix's Hollywood: Why The Famous Sign Says 'Hollywoodland' 

Ryan Murphy's new Netflix miniseries, Hollywood, features the famous Hollywood sign throughout its seven-episode run but with a key difference - here's why it reads 'Hollywoodland' in the show. Netflix's limited series establishes an alternate version of Hollywood's Golden Age, telling the story of a group of filmmakers and actors chasing stardom and dealing with the industry's representation issues. After the fictional Ace Studios green-lights a bold new movie project, 1940s Hollywood becomes a much more inclusive and diverse place than its real-life counterpart ever was. The project itself involves telling the true story of actress Peg Entwistle, who committed suicide in 1932 by leaping to her death from the top of the 'H' in the Hollywood sign.

From the beginning, that legendary typography that sits atop Mount Lee plays a central role in Ryan Murphy's series. In fact, the sign itself features in the very first scene of the show, where Jack Costello (David Corenswet) sits in a cinema watching news of the "starry-eyed dreamers" swarming outside Hollywood studio gates. This first glimpse of the sign, reading 'Hollywoodland', is historically accurate to how it appeared in the mid-40s. It is, of course, this same sign that the cast climb during the show's opening credit sequence.

Related: Hollywood Season 2 Should Be Set In A Different Time

These days, the word 'Hollywood' emblazoned across a particular stretch of the Santa Monica Mountains has become an indelible symbol for the epicenter of moviemaking over which it sits. So why does it appear differently in Hollywood? Well, as it turns out, the sign itself has a history almost as storied as the town it represents.

Now a worldwide symbol for the film industry, the Hollywood sign was actually conceived of as a temporary promotional stunt for the Hollywoodland housing development – these days known as Beachwood Canyon. Back in 1923, developers Woodruff and Shoults envisioned the new neighborhood sitting on the side of the Hollywood Hills – the location of George Cukor's gay pool parties, also depicted in the show. That same year Los Angeles Times publisher Harry Chandler, who had invested in the development, would build the first version of the sign. Costing $21,000 and made up of 43-ft letters, the giant emblem was originally lit up in sections, with 4,000 light bulbs illuminating the various parts of the word in sequence: Holly-Wood-Land.

Constructed using pipes, scaffolding, and telephone poles, the impressive marquee would remain in place despite being originally conceived of as a year-and-a-half-long promotional stunt. With its unprecedented scale and eye-catching illuminated design, the sign itself quickly came to represent more than the housing development it originally referred to. Unfortunately, things would take a dark turn in 1932, when actress Peg Entwistle threw herself to her death from the top of the sign's 'H'. It was this tragic event that inspired 's plot and some of its characters, with Ace studios producing a version of Peg's story but changing her name to Meg Ennis and casting a black actress, named Camille Washington (Laura Harrier) to play her.

The Hollywoodland sign remained in place throughout the great depression and World War II, but by the end of the 1940s had fallen into disrepair. The Netflix series takes place circa 1947, but had it been set any later, the wording would have looked very different. In 1949, the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce decided to restore the once-impressive attraction, which by that point had become almost completely dilapidated and was even missing the 'H', which had crumbled in the years prior. Following a public outcry, original plans to deconstruct the sign were scrapped in favor of a full-on restoration. It was during this restoration that 'land' was removed from the end of the lettering, completing the sign's transformation into a symbol of tinseltown collectively, rather than the original housing development.

Related: Netflix’s Hollywood Ending Explained: What Happens To Each Character

Netflix'swith its rewriting of history, takes place just before this restoration took place, and thus features the original 'Hollywoodland' lettering. During a point when TV was threatening to undermine the film industry in the U.S, the sign itself almost became a casualty of the changing times. Now, it's hard to imagine LA without the famous monument, but the Hollywood Hills came very close to being completely blank by the middle of the century. Thankfully, just like Meg Ennis in the Netflix show, a last minute rescue attempt was successful and the sign remains in place – shorter in length but so much bigger than its architects ever intended.

More: What To Expect From Hollywood Season 2

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