'The world must wake up': Tasks daunting as UN meeting opens

World leaders return to the United Nations' foremost gathering for the first time in two years with a formidable, diplomacy-packed agenda.

'The world must wake up': Tasks daunting as UN meeting opens

In person and on screen, world leaders returned to the United Nations' foremost gathering for the first time in the pandemic era overnight with a formidable, diplomacy-packed agenda and a sharply worded warning from the international organisation's leader: "We face the greatest cascade of crises in our lifetime."

Secretary-General Antonio Guterres rang the alarm in his annual state-of-the-world speech at the opening of the UN General Assembly's high-level meeting for leaders of its 193 member nations. More than 100 heads of state and government kept away by COVID-19 are returning to the UN in person for the first time in two years. But with the pandemic still raging, about 60 will deliver pre-recorded statements over coming days.

"We are on the edge of an abyss — and moving in the wrong direction," Guterres said. "I'm here to sound the alarm. The world must wake up."

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Guterres said people may lose faith not only in their governments and institutions but in basic values when they see their human rights curtailed, corruption, the reality of their harsh lives, no future for their children — and "when they see billionaires joyriding to space while millions go hungry on Earth."

Nevertheless, the UN chief said he does have hope.

Guterres urged world leaders to bridge six "great divides": promote peace and end conflicts, restore trust between the richer north and developing south on tackling global warming, reduce the gap between rich and poor, promote gender equality, ensure that the half of humanity that has no access to the Internet is connected by 2030, and tackle the generational divide by giving young people "a seat at the table."

Other pressing issues on the agenda of world leaders include rising US-China tensions, Afghanistan's unsettled future under its new Taliban rulers and ongoing conflicts in Yemen, Syria and Ethiopia's embattled Tigray region.

The three most closely watched speakers on Tuesday morning are US President Joe Biden, appearing at the UN for the first time since his defeat of Donald Trump in the US election last November; Chinese President Xi Jinping, who in a surprise move will deliver a video address; and Iran's recently elected hardline President Ebrahim Raisi.

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The General Assembly's president, Abdulla Shahid of the Maldives, opened debate by challenging delegates to rise to the occasion. "There are moments in time that are turning points," he said. "This is one such moment."

In his speech, Biden, too, called this moment "an inflection point in history" and said that for the United States to prosper, it "must also engage deeply with the rest of the world."

Ahead of the opening, Guterres warned the world could be plunged into a new and probably more dangerous Cold War unless the United States and China repair their "totally dysfunctional" relationship.

The UN chief said in an interview this weekend with The Associated Press that Washington and Beijing should be cooperating on the climate crisis and negotiating on trade and technology, but "unfortunately, today we only have confrontation" including over human rights and geostrategic problems mainly in the South China Sea.

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Biden, in his speech, insisted he was "not seeing a new Cold War or a world divided" and said Washington is ready to work with any nation, "even if we have intense disagreement in other areas."

On the latest speakers list released earlier this month, China's speech was supposed to be delivered on Friday by a deputy prime minister. But the UN confirmed Monday that Xi will give the country's video address instead. His speech and any comments about the US rivalry are certain to be closely watched and analysed: China's presence in the world, and its relationship with the United States, affect most every corner of the planet.

Other leaders scheduled to speak in person during the meeting, which ends Sept. 27, include King Abdullah II of Jordan, the president of Venezuela, and the prime ministers of Japan, India and the United Kingdom along with Israel's new Prime Minister Naftali Bennett and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

Leaders delivering prerecorded statements this year include the presidents of Egypt, Indonesia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. French President Emmanuel Macron was supposed to deliver a pre-recorded statement on Tuesday, but the government said Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian will now deliver the country's address virtually on the final day.

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France and China have reacted angrily to the surprise announcement by Biden, alongside the leaders of Australia and Britain, of a deal to provide Australia with at least eight nuclear-powered submarines. Australia had signed a contract worth at least $66 billion for a dozen French conventional diesel-electric submarines and their construction was already under way.

Le Drian told a news conference Monday that there is a "crisis of trust" between the United States and its oldest ally, France, as well as Europe, which has been excluded from the new US-UK-Australia alliance focused on the Indo-Pacific and aimed at confrontation with China. He said Europeans "should not be left behind," and need to define their own strategic interests.

By tradition, the first country to speak was Brazil, whose president, Jair Bolsonaro, isn't vaccinated. He reiterated last Thursday that he doesn't plan to get the shot any time soon, justifying his refusal by saying he had COVID-19 and therefore has a high level of antibodies.

A key issue ahead of the meetings has been COVID-19 entry requirements for leaders to the United States — and to the UN headquarters itself. The US requires a vaccination or a recent COVID-19 test, and the UN will operate on an honour system whereby anyone entering the complex attests that they do not have symptoms and have not tested positive in the last 10 days.

Guterres, in his opening speech, pointed to "supersized glaring inequalities" sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic, climate alarm bells "ringing at fever pitch," upheavals from Afghanistan to Ethiopia and Yemen thwarting global peace, a surge of mistrust and misinformation "polarising people and paralysing societies" and human rights "under fire."

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The solidarity of nations to tackle these and other crises "is missing in action just when we need it most," he said. "Instead of humility in the face of these epic challenges, we see hubris."

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Prince Andrew attorney served with sexual assault lawsuit

Prince Andrew was served with legal papers in a civil sexual assault case against him when the senior British royal's US-based lawyer was sent the suit by FedEx and email on Monday, court papers show.

Prince Andrew attorney served with sexual assault lawsuit

Prince Andrew was served with legal papers in a civil sexual assault case against him when the senior British royal's US-based lawyer was sent the suit by FedEx and email on Monday, court papers show.

The US court documents, seen by CNN, show the legal papers were delivered to the duke's lawyer, Andrew B. Brettler, at the law firm of Lavely and Singer in Los Angeles on Monday morning at 9:22 a.m. local time.

The court document also shows legal papers being delivered to the Royal Courts of Justice in London on Monday.

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Andrew, the Queen's second-oldest son, stands accused of sexual assault by Virginia Roberts Giuffre, who is suing the prince in New York.

Giuffre says that the assaults happened in London, New York and the US Virgin Islands, that Andrew was aware that she was a minor (17) when it started, and that she had been trafficked by the late sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

Andrew, 61, has consistently denied the claims, telling the BBC in 2019: "It didn't happen. I can absolutely categorically tell you it never happened. I have no recollection of ever meeting this lady, none whatsoever."

Brettler, his lawyer, has called the case "baseless, non-viable (and) potentially unlawful."

Andrew's team had previously said that he had not been properly served notice of proceedings, despite Giuffre's legal team saying papers were served at the prince's home in Windsor, England.

His lawyers also say a 2009 settlement between Giuffre and Epstein released the duke from "any and all liability," though that settlement was and remains sealed.

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Virginia Roberts Giuffre interview with BBC Panorama

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Last week, US District Judge Lewis Kaplan approved a request from Giuffre's legal team to seek alternative means of serving a lawsuit against Andrew.

Kaplan, approving the request Thursday evening, said that "service of the defendant's United States counsel is reasonably calculated to bring the papers served to the defendant's attention, regardless of whether his US counsel is 'authorised' to accept service on his behalf."

One of Giuffre's lawyers, David Boies, told CNN on Tuesday that "we are pleased that the service issue is now behind us and that we can proceed to a resolution of Ms. Giuffre's claims."

Andrew's legal team said they would not comment when asked by CNN.

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