This Backyard Moon Photo Was Made by Combining Parts from Every Phase

Photographer Andrew McCarthy wanted to create a moon photo with more texture, so he spent two weeks photographing the waxing moon from his backyard and then combined slices from the photos where the shadows are longest. This is what resulted. “It was made by taking a ‘wedge’ just inside the lunar terminator of 12 images […]

This Backyard Moon Photo Was Made by Combining Parts from Every Phase

Photographer Andrew McCarthy wanted to create a moon photo with more texture, so he spent two weeks photographing the waxing moon from his backyard and then combined slices from the photos where the shadows are longest. This is what resulted.

“It was made by taking a ‘wedge’ just inside the lunar terminator of 12 images captured over the last lunar cycle and aligning them using a blend of 3D software and Photoshop, and then blending them all together,” McCarthy tells PetaPixel.

“The Lunar Terminator is where the shadow meets the light side of the moon, and is where shadows are longest so craters and mountains are seen in the most detail,” he writes.

The lunar terminator. Photo by Wouter Hattingh.

“However, I can’t line up perfectly shots from previous nights, because the moon wobbles in its orbit, making a perfect alignment impossible,” McCarthy writes. “So this was created by mapping images to a 3D sphere, which was then adjusted to compensate for the wobble, and then rendered and blended with the image, rinse and repeat.”

A crop showing a closer look at the details on the surface of the moon.

“Once the tones were properly matched it gave much more depth across the entire image,” the photographer says. “The original shots were taken using an ASI1600MM and an edgeHD 800.”

You can find more of McCarthy’s amazing backyard astrophotography work on his Instagram.

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ALPA Wins Counterfeit Case in China: Cameras Are ‘Objects of Applied Art’

The Swiss camera brand ALPA has won a copyright infringement case in China against counterfeiters who copied the company’s designs. In its ruling, the Chinese court acknowledged that ALPA cameras are “objects of applied art” that are worthy of protection. In an announcement posted to its website, ALPA shares that it originally filed the claim […]

ALPA Wins Counterfeit Case in China: Cameras Are ‘Objects of Applied Art’

The Swiss camera brand ALPA has won a copyright infringement case in China against counterfeiters who copied the company’s designs. In its ruling, the Chinese court acknowledged that ALPA cameras are “objects of applied art” that are worthy of protection.

In an announcement posted to its website, ALPA shares that it originally filed the claim in the Chengdu Intermediate People’s Court in the fall of 2016 against a Chinese company called GuoZh, which marketed camera products based clearly on ALPA’s designs.

An online listing for a GuoZh product.

reports that GuoZh had been selling a camera called the FY-2015, which directly copied ALPA’s A12 series.

The GuoZh FY-2015.

Although GuoZh sold some of its products under its own brand name, other products were counterfeits with ALPA branding and sold at a lower price, DPReview writes.

Here are two side-by-side comparisons by ALPA of genuine products (left) next to counterfeit ones (right):

After “four years and countless negotiations,” the court ruled in favor of ALPA “in all respects” and the defendant was found guilty of multiple counts of copyright infringement.

“[T]he court ordered the immediate cessation of production, advertising and sale of the fakes,” ALPA says. “In addition, the defendant must pay compensation and publish a written apology within ten days.”

ALPA CEO Carlina Capaul and Head of Product André Oldani. Photo by ALPA.

“It’s a good feeling that you’re not powerless in the giant system of China after all,” ALPA product head André Oldani tells the Swiss newspaper NZZ, which notes that this may be the first successful case of its kind under China’s “applied art” laws.

Although GuoZh has been ordered to pay “six-figure damages” and publish an apology on its website, the company still has a chance to appeal the ruling (though its prospects of winning the appeal are considered to be very slim). But as of now, the company is continuing to market its products on its website.

(via ALPA via DPReview)

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