Today’s coronavirus news: CDC says coronavirus spreads mainly in the air, through respiratory aerosols and droplets; India records nearly 87,000 new virus cases

The latest coronavirus news from Canada and around the world Monday. This file will be updated throughout the day. Web links to longer stories if available.5:31 a.m.: Britain’s top medical and scientific advisers are set to give a sobering assessment of the COVID-19 pandemic to the public on Monday, amid expectations the government is preparing to announce new measures to control rising infection rates.Chief medical officer Chris Whitty and chief scientific officer Patrick Vallance are scheduled to hold a televised briefing at 11 a.m. BST (1000 GMT) during which they are expected to warn that infection rates are going in the wrong direction and the U.K. faces a challenging winter.Prime Minister Boris Johnson huddled with ministers over the weekend to discuss the government’s reaction. Analysts expect the government to announce a slate of short-term restrictions that will act as a circuit breaker to slow the spread of the disease.5:23 a.m.: Health authorities in Mexico say the coronavirus pandemic has been declining for at least three weeks in 26 of the country’s 32 states.Assistant Health Secretary Hugo López-Gatell, Mexico’s point man for the coronavirus pandemic, said in a press conference Sunday the downward trend was seen in most of the country and that there has also been a decrease in mortality, similar to what has occurred in Europe despite outbreaks on that continent.However, Mexico remains the fourth country with the most deaths from COVID-19, with at least 73,493 killed, behind only the United States, Brazil and India.5:19 a.m.: The Czech Republic’s health minister has resigned amid a record rise of coronavirus infections.Adam Vojtech says his move should create space for a new approach to the pandemic.The country coped well with infections in the spring but has been facing a record surge of new confirmed cases over the past week.On Thursday, the day-to-day increase of new cases was higher than 3,000.The Czech Republic has reported a total of 49,290 infected and 503 deaths since the pandemic began, according to government figures released on Monday.5:14 a.m.: India recorded nearly 87,000 new cases in the past 24 hours. The Health Ministry also Monday reported 1,130 deaths in the past 24 hours, taking the total reported fatalities to 87,882. India now has over 5.4 million reported cases and the nation of 1.3 billion people is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country within weeks, surpassing the United States. India has eased lockdown measures to try to overcome the severe economic impact. On Monday, the 17th century white marble Taj Mahal reopens after a gap of six months for national and international tourists. Restrictions such as compulsory mask-wearing, thermal screening and physical distancing will be used.5:04 a.m.: The coronavirus spreads most commonly in the air, through droplets or other tiny respiratory particles that apparently can remain suspended and inhaled, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says in new guidance.The smaller particles, known as aerosols, are produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks or breathes and can be inhaled into someone’s nose, mouth, airways or lungs, according to the CDC, which says that, in general, indoor settings without good ventilation increase the risk of contagion.“This is thought to be the main way the virus spreads,” the CDC has posted on its website. “There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air and be breathed in by others and travel distances beyond 6 feet (for example, during choir practice, in restaurants or in fitness classes).”Experts on aerosols and the coronavirus said the change constitutes a profound shift in understanding of how the virus that has claimed almost 200,000 lives in the United States spreads. However, the updated two-page explanation provided little new guidance on how to protect against airborne transmission.Previously, the federal health agency had said the coronavirus spreads mainly between people within about 6 feet of one another and through direct propulsion of exhaled droplets that land in the noses and mouths of individuals nearby. The CDC also said — and still says — that people may become infected by touching something that has the virus on it and then touching their mouth, nose or eyes, but that touch is not the main way it spreads.5 a.m.: South Korea’s daily virus tally has stayed below 100 for a second consecutive day, maintaining a slowing trend in fresh infections. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency said Monday the 70 new cases added in the past 24 hours took the country’s total to 23,045 with 385 deaths. The drop to double digits on Sunday was the first in about 40 days.11 p.m.: All remaining virus restrictions will be lifted across much of New Zealand from late Monday with the exception of the largest city, Auckland, which will continue to have some restrictions for at least another 16 days.Prime Minister

Today’s coronavirus news: CDC says coronavirus spreads mainly in the air, through respiratory aerosols and droplets; India records nearly 87,000 new virus cases

The latest coronavirus news from Canada and around the world Monday. This file will be updated throughout the day. Web links to longer stories if available.

5:31 a.m.: Britain’s top medical and scientific advisers are set to give a sobering assessment of the COVID-19 pandemic to the public on Monday, amid expectations the government is preparing to announce new measures to control rising infection rates.

Chief medical officer Chris Whitty and chief scientific officer Patrick Vallance are scheduled to hold a televised briefing at 11 a.m. BST (1000 GMT) during which they are expected to warn that infection rates are going in the wrong direction and the U.K. faces a challenging winter.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson huddled with ministers over the weekend to discuss the government’s reaction. Analysts expect the government to announce a slate of short-term restrictions that will act as a circuit breaker to slow the spread of the disease.

5:23 a.m.: Health authorities in Mexico say the coronavirus pandemic has been declining for at least three weeks in 26 of the country’s 32 states.

Assistant Health Secretary Hugo López-Gatell, Mexico’s point man for the coronavirus pandemic, said in a press conference Sunday the downward trend was seen in most of the country and that there has also been a decrease in mortality, similar to what has occurred in Europe despite outbreaks on that continent.

However, Mexico remains the fourth country with the most deaths from COVID-19, with at least 73,493 killed, behind only the United States, Brazil and India.

5:19 a.m.: The Czech Republic’s health minister has resigned amid a record rise of coronavirus infections.

Adam Vojtech says his move should create space for a new approach to the pandemic.

The country coped well with infections in the spring but has been facing a record surge of new confirmed cases over the past week.

On Thursday, the day-to-day increase of new cases was higher than 3,000.

The Czech Republic has reported a total of 49,290 infected and 503 deaths since the pandemic began, according to government figures released on Monday.

5:14 a.m.: India recorded nearly 87,000 new cases in the past 24 hours. The Health Ministry also Monday reported 1,130 deaths in the past 24 hours, taking the total reported fatalities to 87,882. India now has over 5.4 million reported cases and the nation of 1.3 billion people is expected to become the pandemic’s worst-hit country within weeks, surpassing the United States.

India has eased lockdown measures to try to overcome the severe economic impact. On Monday, the 17th century white marble Taj Mahal reopens after a gap of six months for national and international tourists. Restrictions such as compulsory mask-wearing, thermal screening and physical distancing will be used.

5:04 a.m.: The coronavirus spreads most commonly in the air, through droplets or other tiny respiratory particles that apparently can remain suspended and inhaled, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says in new guidance.

The smaller particles, known as aerosols, are produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks or breathes and can be inhaled into someone’s nose, mouth, airways or lungs, according to the CDC, which says that, in general, indoor settings without good ventilation increase the risk of contagion.

“This is thought to be the main way the virus spreads,” the CDC has posted on its website. “There is growing evidence that droplets and airborne particles can remain suspended in the air and be breathed in by others and travel distances beyond 6 feet (for example, during choir practice, in restaurants or in fitness classes).”

Experts on aerosols and the coronavirus said the change constitutes a profound shift in understanding of how the virus that has claimed almost 200,000 lives in the United States spreads. However, the updated two-page explanation provided little new guidance on how to protect against airborne transmission.

Previously, the federal health agency had said the coronavirus spreads mainly between people within about 6 feet of one another and through direct propulsion of exhaled droplets that land in the noses and mouths of individuals nearby. The CDC also said — and still says — that people may become infected by touching something that has the virus on it and then touching their mouth, nose or eyes, but that touch is not the main way it spreads.

5 a.m.: South Korea’s daily virus tally has stayed below 100 for a second consecutive day, maintaining a slowing trend in fresh infections. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency said Monday the 70 new cases added in the past 24 hours took the country’s total to 23,045 with 385 deaths. The drop to double digits on Sunday was the first in about 40 days.

11 p.m.: All remaining virus restrictions will be lifted across much of New Zealand from late Monday with the exception of the largest city, Auckland, which will continue to have some restrictions for at least another 16 days.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern made the announcement Monday after meeting with top lawmakers. The nation of 5 million people reimposed some restrictions last month after the Auckland outbreak, which now appears to be under control.

Under the plan, maximum gathering sizes in Auckland will be increased from 10 to 100 on Wednesday and then caps removed two weeks after that.

“Auckland needs more time,” Ardern told reporters in the city. “Whilst we have reasonable confidence we are on the right track, there is still a need in Auckland for that cautious approach.”

Sunday 8:05 p.m. Employees at three LCBO stores in Toronto have recently tested positive for the coronavirus.

On Saturday, the crown agency corporation was notified that an employee at its 396 St. Clair Ave. W. location in Forest Hill has contracted the virus.

In a statement on Sunday, the LCBO said the worker’s last in-store shift was Sept. 12.

The corporation said the employee is currently self-isolating at home.

“Public Health has not provided any directions or recommendations with respect to this location. This general notice is being provided out of transparency,” it said.

“The LCBO has several measures to keep employees and customers safe, including regular cleaning and sanitization and in-store measures that promote physical distancing.”

On Thursday, the LCBO said it learned about two employees at two different locations in North York that have contracted the coronavirus.

The first employee works at the 1618 Wilson Ave. location in Sheridan Mall. Their last in-store shift was Sept. 9.

The second case is an employee at an LCBO store at Yorkgate Mall at 1 York Gate Blvd.

This worker’s last in-store shift was Sept. 12.

“We wish them well as they self-isolate at home,” the LCBO said in a Sept. 17 statement.

The corporation said both stores have been “regularly cleaned and disinfected since the employees’ last shifts.”

Click here for more of Sunday’s COVID-19 coverage.

Source : Toronto Star More