Top 10 reasons why Bauhaus were the true children of Ziggy and the most innovative post punk adventurers.

Bauhaus finally play the Alexandra Palace in London on Saturday and we celebrate the most innovative of bands from the post-punk period The post Top 10 reasons why Bauhaus were the true children of Ziggy and the most innovative post punk adventurers. appeared first on Louder Than War.

Top 10 reasons why Bauhaus were the true children of Ziggy and the most innovative post punk adventurers.

Thankfully Bauhaus have managed to resume their world tour that was so rudely interrupted by Covid. Online evidence of their two huge shows in Mexico City show a band yet again back at the top of their game and this Saturday’s upcoming gig at the wonderful Alexandra Palace in London (last few tickets from https://www.alttickets.com/bauhaus-tickets  ) will be further evidence of their resurrection – a true back from the dead tour!

1. In 2021 Bauhaus are bigger than ever and if the media generally ignores them because they are fixated on their own narrow definition of alternative music and culture we all know the real truth and this band’s huge influence and also capability of creating timeless ground breaking music is appreciated world wide.

2. Post-punk was a complex period with a million different escape routes and even more takes on the wild energy released by punk rock. Oddly this has never really been reflected in the given narrative which has somehow rebranded the period as something far more austere and narrow than it really was whilst elevating minor cult figures to scene leaders and ignoring the real innovators. 

3. The tragedy of this is that Bauhaus have been endlessly labelled Goth which only tells a small part of their story. For sure there was a playful darkness about their muse that was, of course, attractive and thrilling but there was so much at play here. In many ways they were the true children of Ziggy and answering all the question marks thrown up by glam and then adding the adventure and the intense energy of punk to the mix whilst understanding the space of dub to play around in with the added groove of funk and disco.

4. Far from being a goth postcard the band were art rock pioneers and marrying myriad of forms into an adventurous musical journey of their own. If Bowie had spent the early seventies doing interviews that were a crash course for the ravers with book and culture lists for a small clutch of eager fans who wanted to enter the rabbit hole with tips on the dark trip it was the artful dodgers like the then youthful pre Bauhaus youth in Northampton that were picking up on these hints of somewhere beyond. Tips they would use to create their own distinctive and powerful adventure.

5. Adding a dollop of art rock Bauhaus immersed themselves in the mid seventies underground and when they came to record themselves you can hear their embrace of Eno, Marc, the Velvets, Iggy and so much more of the then frontier music but somehow melded into something that sounded futurist and mind melting and of their own.

6. Their dark glam was updated for the very different post punk era and they made it sound futuristic. 

7. Bela Lugosi’s Dead invented dark dub…Massive Attack were listening and would eventually run with the concept. Savages were also immersed in their powerful shape shifting rhythms and guitar shrapnel – the list of bands taking their cue from Bauhaus could go on for ever and pops up in the most unlikely places. Musicians see them as innovators. Like many of the so called Goth bands that they never looked for being corralled into some sort of spurious scene and they understood the power of the dance floor. No matter how esoteric Bauhaus got or how many different styles they corral into their own muse they still play to the dance floor.  The art of dance and the power of movement and the sex of the music was the ultimate media and many of their songs have become eternal hip swingers. 

8.  They were dark and they were also playful. They could switch from music concrete to brilliant joyful covers of Bowie, Bolan, Cale and Eno. 

9. They never got on with much of the music media at the time – perhaps they were too flash and darkly glam for the dowdier dour dressed down cliche idea of the underground musician at the period. Bauhaus never shied away from a challenge and their made up, fishnet take on Bowie and Iggy Berlin all nighter madness looked great and was perfect challenge to the creeping conservatism of post punk. 

10. They were innovators. Daniel Ash never plays a trad rock riff on his guitar – no boring solos – every note has a reason and his telecaster is stretched into many sounds, textures and nuance from e-bow drones to scratchy funk to dub shapes. The rhythm section is always inventive and the bass leads many songs – post punk was about all instruments in their own sexual space and Bauhaus were masters of that. Add to this Peter Murphy’s great voice that feed way beyond its Bowie roots and found many idiosyncratic nooks and crevices of its own. 

The post Top 10 reasons why Bauhaus were the true children of Ziggy and the most innovative post punk adventurers. appeared first on Louder Than War.

Source : Louder Than War More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Grace Petrie On Streaming, Fan Power, And The Way Ahead

"If music costs money to make but doesn’t pay – we risk turning it into a pastime of the rich..."When the pandemic came into focus Grace Petrie was thousands of miles from home.Attempting to navigate the Australian leg of her sold out tour, lockdown saw the songwriter pack her bags and head home, her future suddenly uncertain.Working in a frenzied fashion, Grace Petrie polished off a new album - the critically praised 'Connectivity' - and took part in a special project, raising over £11,000 for The Big Issue by posting covers on YouTube.Maintaining her fanbase through relentless hard work, independently released new album 'Connectivity' up-turned expectations by gate-crashing the charts.It's a result made all the more remarkable for the way it was released, with Grace Petrie eschewing the major streaming services for a more direct-to-fans approach.Reflecting on her unexpected success, Grace Petrie writes for Clash about what she's learned - and what path the future may take.- - -- - -Last week was a big one for me. Against all odds ‘Connectivity’ - my new, unsigned and independently-funded album - got into the charts, debuting at 37 in the overall chart, reaching number two in the independent albums chart, and topping the UK downloads chart. Whilst it would be fun for me to pretend that this heralds some sign of previously unseen music industry significance, the real story behind this unbelievable result was one of pure fan power.When the record was released we at GPHQ realised that the pre-orders numbered enough that we might just be in with a chance. After twelve years as an unsigned artist I had long since accepted that things like the chart were beyond my reach. But… we were so close. If we missed out by a couple of hundred sales because I hadn’t given it everything, I knew I’d regret it. So against my better judgment, and feeling incredibly silly, I put out a call to arms on social media – asking listeners to please, if they like my music, make sure to actually buy it – and before the chart closed Thursday night.The response was breathtaking. In the next 24 hours, 678 people bought the record from Bandcamp alone. I am unspeakably lucky to have the support of a community I have picked up over a decade of touring in just about any line-up that will have me. Comments across all social platforms were filled with encouragement and screenshots of the downloaded record – but among them, like a black fly in my Chardonnay, was one stubbornly resounding question: why isn’t it on Spotify?The decision to hold back the album from streaming sites – or the most unethically run ones, anyway – was taken extremely heavily. I lost sleep over it. Artists are so conditioned to believe Spotify is the big prize draw, and if you play you might just pull the golden ticket – have your song chosen for an official playlist, going out to millions of people – so who would rule themselves out of that? Not to mention the almost hegemonic cultural status that it now holds, with promoters now routinely checking your play count to decide if you’re a good booking; we need gigs, and we are told relentlessly that we need those numbers to look healthy to get them.Ultimately, though, nearly two years’ worth of touring income lost to lockdown made the decision for me, and with studio debts still to pay I couldn’t afford to give the record away for fractions of pennies per play – at least, until it had paid for itself. When I explained to those looking to stream the album that I needed instead to sell it for a fair price, most of them were only too happy to download it. And please don’t get me wrong; I am unbelievably grateful for them all. But that gratitude shouldn’t stop me from saying that the number of people who needed to be given ‘a tangible reason’ to actually buy music they already wanted was staggering – and worrying.Listen - it is truly not my intention to chastise people. But as an artist who has been lucky enough to make a music career viable, I think I have a responsibility to give voice to my growing discomfort that the ladder I climbed has disappeared beneath me. As a teenager in the 2000s I snuck into the music business through a window left open by Myspace and later Bandcamp which allowed me to sell music directly; and through the generosity of other artists found a fanbase as a support act. Selling self-released, shoe-string budget-made CDs at those shows paid my rent for a decade. Now CDs are on their way to extinction, I realise that if I was ten years younger, I never would have been able to make the leap into being a full-time musician. And while there are plenty who’d say that’s no great loss – the reality is that our current model of virtually unpaid streaming could kill independent music completely.In most ways the internet has made music more accessible to unsigned voices: you don’t need to hire a studio these days – anyone with a microphone and a laptop can theoretically record. But as the streaming market becomes c

Grace Petrie On Streaming, Fan Power, And The Way Ahead
"If music costs money to make but doesn’t pay – we risk turning it into a pastime of the rich..."

When the pandemic came into focus Grace Petrie was thousands of miles from home.

Attempting to navigate the Australian leg of her sold out tour, lockdown saw the songwriter pack her bags and head home, her future suddenly uncertain.

Working in a frenzied fashion, Grace Petrie polished off a new album - the critically praised 'Connectivity' - and took part in a special project, raising over £11,000 for The Big Issue by posting covers on YouTube.

Maintaining her fanbase through relentless hard work, independently released new album 'Connectivity' up-turned expectations by gate-crashing the charts.

It's a result made all the more remarkable for the way it was released, with Grace Petrie eschewing the major streaming services for a more direct-to-fans approach.

Reflecting on her unexpected success, Grace Petrie writes for Clash about what she's learned - and what path the future may take.

- - -

- - -

Last week was a big one for me. Against all odds ‘Connectivity’ - my new, unsigned and independently-funded album - got into the charts, debuting at 37 in the overall chart, reaching number two in the independent albums chart, and topping the UK downloads chart. Whilst it would be fun for me to pretend that this heralds some sign of previously unseen music industry significance, the real story behind this unbelievable result was one of pure fan power.

When the record was released we at GPHQ realised that the pre-orders numbered enough that we might just be in with a chance. After twelve years as an unsigned artist I had long since accepted that things like the chart were beyond my reach. But… we were so close. If we missed out by a couple of hundred sales because I hadn’t given it everything, I knew I’d regret it. So against my better judgment, and feeling incredibly silly, I put out a call to arms on social media – asking listeners to please, if they like my music, make sure to actually buy it – and before the chart closed Thursday night.

The response was breathtaking. In the next 24 hours, 678 people bought the record from Bandcamp alone. I am unspeakably lucky to have the support of a community I have picked up over a decade of touring in just about any line-up that will have me. Comments across all social platforms were filled with encouragement and screenshots of the downloaded record – but among them, like a black fly in my Chardonnay, was one stubbornly resounding question: why isn’t it on Spotify?

The decision to hold back the album from streaming sites – or the most unethically run ones, anyway – was taken extremely heavily. I lost sleep over it. Artists are so conditioned to believe Spotify is the big prize draw, and if you play you might just pull the golden ticket – have your song chosen for an official playlist, going out to millions of people – so who would rule themselves out of that? Not to mention the almost hegemonic cultural status that it now holds, with promoters now routinely checking your play count to decide if you’re a good booking; we need gigs, and we are told relentlessly that we need those numbers to look healthy to get them.

Ultimately, though, nearly two years’ worth of touring income lost to lockdown made the decision for me, and with studio debts still to pay I couldn’t afford to give the record away for fractions of pennies per play – at least, until it had paid for itself. When I explained to those looking to stream the album that I needed instead to sell it for a fair price, most of them were only too happy to download it. And please don’t get me wrong; I am unbelievably grateful for them all. But that gratitude shouldn’t stop me from saying that the number of people who needed to be given ‘a tangible reason’ to actually buy music they already wanted was staggering – and worrying.

Listen - it is truly not my intention to chastise people. But as an artist who has been lucky enough to make a music career viable, I think I have a responsibility to give voice to my growing discomfort that the ladder I climbed has disappeared beneath me. As a teenager in the 2000s I snuck into the music business through a window left open by Myspace and later Bandcamp which allowed me to sell music directly; and through the generosity of other artists found a fanbase as a support act. Selling self-released, shoe-string budget-made CDs at those shows paid my rent for a decade. Now CDs are on their way to extinction, I realise that if I was ten years younger, I never would have been able to make the leap into being a full-time musician. And while there are plenty who’d say that’s no great loss – the reality is that our current model of virtually unpaid streaming could kill independent music completely.

In most ways the internet has made music more accessible to unsigned voices: you don’t need to hire a studio these days – anyone with a microphone and a laptop can theoretically record. But as the streaming market becomes completely saturated with largely uncompensated music, the expectation that artists will pay for things like press agents, high quality photo and video materials and advertising to get their stuff heard – hasn’t diminished. If anything, the reliance on those things has grown.

And if music costs money to make but doesn’t pay – we risk turning it into a pastime of the rich. Streaming may be convenient, but if people stop buying altogether then artists without money will be priced out. And those truly independent voices, that labels and press and industry won’t support will be the first ones we lose.

- - -

Connectivity by Grace Petrie

- - -

'Connectivity' is out now.

- - -

Source : Clash Music More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.