Top 5 Healthy Breakfasts To Start Your Day

We have options for everyone, including vegans, vegetarians and gluten-free enthusiasts, so get ready to transform your mornings with these amazing breakfast ideas!More

Top 5 Healthy Breakfasts To Start Your Day

Written By Claudia Montez / Reviewed By Ray Spotts

You've heard it a thousand times, but do you know why breakfast is the most important meal of the day? It gives you energy. It replenishes the glucose in your body and starts converting it into fuel. It can also kick-start your metabolism and help you burn more calories throughout the day. So if you're trying to lose weight, it's an easy way to work on that fat-burning and thigh-busting.

Once you understand the importance of eating breakfast, you'll be ready to try some of these amazing healthy breakfast recipes. We have options for everyone, including vegans, vegetarians and gluten-free enthusiasts, so get ready to transform your mornings with these amazing breakfast ideas!

1. Quinoa Egg Breakfast Muffins

If you love breakfast muffins but hate the carbs that usually come with them, quinoa egg muffins are a healthier alternative. Also, they're super simple to make, and they can be frozen and re-heated for busy mornings in the future!

You start with a cup of cooked and cooled quinoa. Blend in six eggs and a smattering of salt and pepper. If you like cheese, some shredded cheddar can add both flavor and an ooey-gooey texture. You can also toss in your choice of veggies; the sky is the limit here, so feel free to experiment with spinach, mushrooms, tomatoes, broccoli, onions and more.

When you've mixed the batter to your satisfaction, pour it into muffin tins and bake it for 20 to 25 minutes. Voila! You've just created thick, fluffy breakfast muffins without a bit of gluten!

2. Tofu Scramble

Tofu is a superfood that contains all nine essential amino acids. It's vegan and vegetarian-friendly, and it contains no sugar, fat or gluten. It's also highly versatile: You can prepare tofu in ways that mimic everything from ground beef to grilled chicken!

Tofu scrambles are quite easy to make. They use crumbled tofu like scrambled eggs, and you can customize them with whatever veggies that you have on hand.

If you like your greens, you can add spinach, kale, asparagus or broccoli. If you enjoy the spice of the southwest, you can toss in some onions, red peppers, cumin and chili powder. Put an oriental twist on it by adding some kimchi. If you live with a meat or dairy lover, you can add cheese, ham, sausage or bacon to their portion.

Preparation is also simple: Just sauté the veggies before adding the tofu to the pan. Crumble it with a fork to get a fluffy, egg-like consistency. One important side note: Make sure to drain your tofu before cooking with it!

3. Overnight Oats

Oatmeal is packed with fiber, protein, antioxidants and other nutritional benefits that make it a breakfast superfood. But what if you aren't a fan of the hot stuff? Is there a way to prepare oatmeal that's light and fresh?


The answer is yes. When you make "overnight" oats, you soak the dry oatmeal in water or milk for several hours, and the end result is a tasty, effortless meal that puts a fun twist on the traditional Quaker guy. Another great thing about overnight oats is that you can customize them in hundreds of ways:

  • Maple French Toast Oats: Cinnamon, vanilla extract, maple syrup, flaxseed
  • Peanut Butter and Jelly Oats: Peanut butter, strawberry jam, almond milk
  • Banana Bread Oats: Bananas, walnuts, cinnamon, nutmeg
  • Moose Tracks Oats: Cocoa powder, Greek yogurt, chocolate chips

You can also eat them plain or with small slices of fruit for extra antioxidants!

4. Sheet Pan Protein Pancakes

Another great recipe for busy folks without a lot of time in the mornings, these "sheet pan" pancakes are ideal for meal prep. You can make them on the weekend and freeze them for the days ahead.

The recipe is simple, and it's pretty much identical to traditional pancakes. You'll need flour, milk, eggs, butter, baking powder and your favorite fruit such as blueberries or strawberries. For extra protein, we also recommend a scoop of protein powder.

Here's where things get interesting. Rather than pouring the batter into a griddle, you pour it into a pan and bake it! The end result is basically an extra-cakey pancake, and you can cut it into squares for perfectly proportioned meals all week long.

5. Breakfast Quesadilla

Last but not least, who doesn't love breakfast quesadillas? When you stuff them with eggs and veggies rather than fattening things like cheese and sour cream, you'll have a tasty and healthy meal to get your morning started right.

The contents can be anything that you'd like. Common ingredients include red onion, bell pepper, salsa and other things with zesty flavors, but you can customize them as you see fit. You can even indulge in some cheese as long as you use it in moderation! Crumbled feta will taste divine with some bacon or ham.

As for preparation, quesadillas are usually fried, but you can also pop them in the oven if you're trying to watch your oil intake. Enjoy your yummy and healthy breakfast!

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Written By:

Claudia Montez is a content specialist with over four years of experience, currently working with MealFan. Her background in marketing and her experiences raising a family have given her insight into a wide variety of subjects. When not writing, she enjoys spending time with family, art, music, and the beach.

Reviewed By:

Founder Ray Spotts has a passion for all things natural and has made a life study of nature as it relates to health and well-being. Ray became a forerunner bringing products to market that are extraordinarily effective and free from potentially harmful chemicals and additives. For this reason Ray formed , a company you can trust for clean, effective, and healthy products. Ray is an organic gardener, likes fishing, hiking, and teaching and mentoring people to start new businesses. You can get his book for free, “How To Succeed In Business Based On God’s Word,” at . 

Photo by Cleanlight Photo on Unsplash

Source : Trusted Health Products More   

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FDA: Monitor COVID Vaccine Recipients for Facial Paralysis

Media is featuring a near-24/7 stream of propaganda encouraging the public to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Most of the advertisements make no mention of the potential adverse effects associated with it, which is a key factor necessary for informed consent. Facial paralysis, sometimes referred to as Bell’s palsy when it has no known cause, is one such adverse effect. During Phase 3 clinical trials of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, more cases of facial paralysis occurred in the vaccine groups (seven out of 35,654) compared to the placebo group (one out of 35,611), leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to recommended monitoring vaccine recipients for facial paralysis.1 Facial Paralysis’ Ties to COVID Vaccine In response to the FDA recommendation to monitor for facial paralysis following COVID-19 vaccination, and noting that the clinical trials did not establish a causal relationship, a team of French researchers explored the connection further using the World Health Organization pharmacovigilance database, VigiBase.2 They concluded that the COVID-19 vaccines did not appear to have an association with facial paralysis, stating “if an association between facial paralysis and mRNA COVID-19 vaccines exists, the risk is likely very low, as with other viral vaccines.”3 However, it should be noted that the control groups used for comparison were not inert placebos, but one group using “other viral vaccines” and one group that received influenza vaccines. It’s well-known that Bell’s palsy is an adverse effect following vaccination, so all the study found is that COVID-19 vaccines do not increase the risk above and beyond that of other viral vaccines. For instance, an association between administration of the inactivated influenza vaccine and onset of Bell’s palsy symptoms has been previously documented,4,5 so comparing COVID-19 vaccines to flu vaccines isn’t giving a true picture of risk, as would emerge if compared to an inert placebo. As the researchers noted:6 “Isolated facial paralysis after vaccination has been reported as case reports for decades with almost all viral vaccines, and it is thought to be immune mediated or induced by viral reactivations (eg, reactivation of a herpes virus infection) … When compared with other viral vaccines, mRNA COVID-19 vaccines did not display a signal of facial paralysis … the reporting rate of facial paralysis after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination found in the present study is not higher than that observed with other viral vaccines.” This isn’t to say that cases weren’t reported, however. Out of 133,883 adverse drug reactions reported following mRNA COVID-19 vaccines reported to VigiBase on March 9, 2021, the researchers identified 844 facial paralysis-related events, including (some of the cases reported multiple adverse events): 683 cases of facial paralysis 168 cases of facial paresis 25 cases of facial spasms 13 cases of facial nerve disorders Cases ‘Almost Always Dramatically Underreported’ WHO’s VigiBase pharmacovigilance database uses data from different systems, including the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), which makes up about one-third of the reports used in the French study.7 Adverse events are notoriously underreported to VAERS and other pharmacovigilance databases, which rely on mostly voluntary reports, making it difficult to draw population-wide estimates from their data. As noted by Al Ozonoff, Ph.D., of Harvard Medical School in MedPage Today, adverse event cases are “almost always dramatically underreported in terms of the incidence of events. I think we simply don't have enough data right now to come to a firm conclusion."8 Study co-author Charles Khouri, PharmD, of University Grenoble Alpes in France, also told MedPage Today, "While spontaneously reversible in the vast majority of cases, facial paralyses are serious and debilitating adverse drug reactions. Should a link be established, this adverse reaction has the potential to hamper the vaccination campaign."9 Palsy Case After Second Dose Warrants Further Investigation The Phase 3 clinical trials of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines had enough Bell’s palsy cases to suggest a potential safety signal,10 which is information on an adverse event that may be caused by a medicine or vaccine that warrants further investigation. The French study suggested no higher safety signal for COVID-19 vaccines and Bell’s palsy compared to other vaccines, but limitations to the data were present. Other studies, however, have called for more investigation. A case report published in Brain, Behavior & Immunity Health described a 57-year-old woman with a history of Bell’s palsy, who developed the condition less than 36 hours after receiving her second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.11 Her symptoms, including facial droop, got worse over the next 72 hours, and the case was significant enough that the researchers, with Adventist Health White Memor

FDA: Monitor COVID Vaccine Recipients for Facial Paralysis

Media is featuring a near-24/7 stream of propaganda encouraging the public to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Most of the advertisements make no mention of the potential adverse effects associated with it, which is a key factor necessary for informed consent. Facial paralysis, sometimes referred to as Bell’s palsy when it has no known cause, is one such adverse effect.

During Phase 3 clinical trials of mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, more cases of facial paralysis occurred in the vaccine groups (seven out of 35,654) compared to the placebo group (one out of 35,611), leading the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to recommended monitoring vaccine recipients for facial paralysis.1

Facial Paralysis’ Ties to COVID Vaccine

In response to the FDA recommendation to monitor for facial paralysis following COVID-19 vaccination, and noting that the clinical trials did not establish a causal relationship, a team of French researchers explored the connection further using the World Health Organization pharmacovigilance database, VigiBase.2

They concluded that the COVID-19 vaccines did not appear to have an association with facial paralysis, stating “if an association between facial paralysis and mRNA COVID-19 vaccines exists, the risk is likely very low, as with other viral vaccines.”3 However, it should be noted that the control groups used for comparison were not inert placebos, but one group using “other viral vaccines” and one group that received influenza vaccines.

It’s well-known that Bell’s palsy is an adverse effect following vaccination, so all the study found is that COVID-19 vaccines do not increase the risk above and beyond that of other viral vaccines.

For instance, an association between administration of the inactivated influenza vaccine and onset of Bell’s palsy symptoms has been previously documented,4,5 so comparing COVID-19 vaccines to flu vaccines isn’t giving a true picture of risk, as would emerge if compared to an inert placebo. As the researchers noted:6

“Isolated facial paralysis after vaccination has been reported as case reports for decades with almost all viral vaccines, and it is thought to be immune mediated or induced by viral reactivations (eg, reactivation of a herpes virus infection) …

When compared with other viral vaccines, mRNA COVID-19 vaccines did not display a signal of facial paralysis … the reporting rate of facial paralysis after mRNA COVID-19 vaccination found in the present study is not higher than that observed with other viral vaccines.”

This isn’t to say that cases weren’t reported, however. Out of 133,883 adverse drug reactions reported following mRNA COVID-19 vaccines reported to VigiBase on March 9, 2021, the researchers identified 844 facial paralysis-related events, including (some of the cases reported multiple adverse events):

  • 683 cases of facial paralysis
  • 168 cases of facial paresis
  • 25 cases of facial spasms
  • 13 cases of facial nerve disorders

Cases ‘Almost Always Dramatically Underreported’

WHO’s VigiBase pharmacovigilance database uses data from different systems, including the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), which makes up about one-third of the reports used in the French study.7 Adverse events are notoriously underreported to VAERS and other pharmacovigilance databases, which rely on mostly voluntary reports, making it difficult to draw population-wide estimates from their data.

As noted by Al Ozonoff, Ph.D., of Harvard Medical School in MedPage Today, adverse event cases are “almost always dramatically underreported in terms of the incidence of events. I think we simply don't have enough data right now to come to a firm conclusion."8

Study co-author Charles Khouri, PharmD, of University Grenoble Alpes in France, also told MedPage Today, "While spontaneously reversible in the vast majority of cases, facial paralyses are serious and debilitating adverse drug reactions. Should a link be established, this adverse reaction has the potential to hamper the vaccination campaign."9

Palsy Case After Second Dose Warrants Further Investigation

The Phase 3 clinical trials of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines had enough Bell’s palsy cases to suggest a potential safety signal,10 which is information on an adverse event that may be caused by a medicine or vaccine that warrants further investigation. The French study suggested no higher safety signal for COVID-19 vaccines and Bell’s palsy compared to other vaccines, but limitations to the data were present.

Other studies, however, have called for more investigation. A case report published in Brain, Behavior & Immunity Health described a 57-year-old woman with a history of Bell’s palsy, who developed the condition less than 36 hours after receiving her second dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.11

Her symptoms, including facial droop, got worse over the next 72 hours, and the case was significant enough that the researchers, with Adventist Health White Memorial in Los Angeles, suggested further investigation may be warranted:12

“Given the expedited production of the vaccine and the novelty associated with its production, there may be information pertaining to side effects and individual response that remain to be discovered. Since both the Moderna and Pfizer Vaccine trials reported Bell’s Palsy as medically attended adverse events, the association between vaccine administration and onset of symptomatic Bell’s Palsy may warrant further investigation.

… With previous association found between the administration of the inactivated Influenza Vaccine and onset of Bell’s Palsy symptoms, there remains the possibility of a causal association between these symptoms and the COVID-19 vaccine.”

In their official guidance, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that people who have a history of Bell’s palsy may receive a COVID-19 vaccine, even though cases were reported during COVID-19 vaccine clinical trials.13 During the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine trials, three cases of Bell’s palsy occurred in the vaccine group compared to none in the placebo group.

In the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine trials, three cases were reported among vaccine recipients compared to one case in the placebo group. According to the Adventist Health researchers, “Considering the temporal association and biological plausibility, FDA recommends surveillance for cases of Bell’s Palsy with deployment of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine into larger populations.”14

The CDC, in their guidelines for contraindications, also reported “post-authorization safety surveillance will be important to monitor Bell’s Palsy symptoms, in patients with prior episodes, following vaccine administration to further assess any potential causal association.”15

Meningitis, Hepatitis B Vaccines Linked to Bell’s Palsy

As mentioned, vaccinations have previously been linked to Bell’s palsy, which causes paralysis or weakness of facial muscles. In a study16 using data from nearly 49,000 people between the ages of 11 and 21 years, Hung-Fu Tseng, Ph. D., from the Southern California Permanente Medical Group in Pasadena, California, and colleagues evaluated the safety of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine.

A significantly increased risk of Bell’s palsy was found when the vaccine (Menveo) was given along with another vaccination. The condition typically occurred five to 10 weeks after vaccination. Overall, the risk of Bell’s palsy increased 2.9-fold in the 12 weeks after vaccination among those administered concomitant vaccines.

Bell’s palsy has previously been noted as a complication of hepatitis B,17 smallpox and influenza vaccination (seasonal and H1N1) as well.18 Research published in Human Vaccines & Imunotherapeutics also revealed an increased risk of cranial nerve palsies following vaccination, especially combinations of vaccines.19

In 59% of the cases, the palsies were identified as serious, which suggests, the authors noted, “that a cranial nerve palsy may sometimes be the harbinger of a broader and more ominous clinical entity, such as a stroke or encephalomyelitis [inflammation of the brain and spinal cord].” They continued:20

“Cranial nerve palsies have been reported to VAERS following a wide variety of inactivated and live attenuated vaccines. Reports for trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine were the most frequent among single-vaccine reports, but they constituted only a weak plurality and not an overwhelming majority.

The reports listing multiple vaccines largely reflected the most common combinations of routine immunizations administered to infants and young children: Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis vaccine, Hemophilus influenzae type b vaccine, Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 7-valent, and Poliovirus vaccine inactivated given together, as well as measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine live co-administered with varicella vaccine live.”

Blood Clots Also Being Investigated

Another “safety signal” being investigated in relation to COVID-19 vaccines are blood clots — specifically cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) following vaccination with the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine manufactured by Johnson & Johnson.

Using data from VAERS, which again typically only includes a fraction of the actual number of adverse events, 12 women between the ages of 18 and 59 developed symptoms within six to 15 days after vaccination.21 Of the 12 patients, 10 required intensive care, seven had intracerebral hemorrhage as well and three died. In a JAMA editorial, it’s noted:22

“[T]he case for a causal relationship with vaccine administration includes a much higher reported rate of CVST with thrombocytopenia (approximately 5 per million women aged 18-50 years shortly after vaccination) than the background rate (approximately 0.05-0.13 per million per month, based on estimated annual US incidence of 0.7-1.6 per million per year).”

Similarities were also noted between these cases and thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS), which has been associated with the ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccine manufactured by Oxford/AstraZeneca. Both AstraZeneca’s and Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccines use similar technology involving modified adenovirus vectors.23

According to German investigators, the blood clots linked to AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine may be “due to a particular immune response that activates platelets and thus triggers thrombosis.”24 There is, quite simply, much that is unknown about these experimental vaccines, and only time will tell what the true adverse event rates are. According to the JAMA editorial:25

“Faced with similar safety signals, nations have taken different policy approaches. As of this writing, Norway and Denmark have suspended using the ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccine. Iceland and Germany have limited the use of the ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccine to people older than 60 years.”

It’s also been suggested, according to researchers at King’s College, that people who have already had COVID are three times more likely to experience vaccine side effects than those who have not been exposed to the virus, and this appears true for both mRNA and DNA versions of the vaccine.26

Dr. Hooman Noorchashm, a cardiac surgeon and patient advocate, even suggested to the FDA that prescreening for SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins may reduce the risk of injuries and deaths following vaccination, as the vaccine may trigger an adverse immune response in those who have already been infected with the virus.27 Perhaps such caution is also warranted among people with a history of adverse events, such as Bell’s palsy.

Source : Mercola More   

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