Toronto and Peel are closing workplaces with five or more COVID-19 cases. Here’s how we got here

Toronto and Peel Regions have both announced they will be closing workplaces with five or more positive COVID-19 cases. The regions have used a Section 22 order to supersede the province and shutter workplaces. This comes after health experts on the province’s volunteer-led Science Advisory Table urged the province to shutter non-essential workplaces and implement paid sick leave to drive down growing case numbers and ICU admissions.Workplaces hard-hit by the virus such as manufacturing and warehousing were previously untouched by the province’s health measures. Similarly, workers have sounded the alarm that they are ineligible for vaccines despite working on the front line throughout the pandemic. In some essential services such as grocery, manufacturing and transport, many do not know details about when they will receive a dose. Cases in Toronto have reached record-high levels driven by the contagious B.1.1.7 variant. Meanwhile, hospitalizations are the highest recorded and expected to increase.Health experts have stressed that vaccinating workers is imperative to slowing the spread of the virus. Some of Toronto’s wealthiest neighbourhoods are seeing higher rates of vaccinations than areas of the city with higher rates of COVID-19, driven largely by workplace outbreaks. Calls for paid sick leave have grown louder to help address workplace spread by allowing workers to stay home if they are experiencing systems.

Toronto and Peel are closing workplaces with five or more COVID-19 cases. Here’s how we got here

Toronto and Peel Regions have both announced they will be closing workplaces with five or more positive COVID-19 cases.

The regions have used a Section 22 order to supersede the province and shutter workplaces. This comes after health experts on the province’s volunteer-led Science Advisory Table urged the province to shutter non-essential workplaces and implement paid sick leave to drive down growing case numbers and ICU admissions.

Workplaces hard-hit by the virus such as manufacturing and warehousing were previously untouched by the province’s health measures.

Similarly, workers have sounded the alarm that they are ineligible for vaccines despite working on the front line throughout the pandemic. In some essential services such as grocery, manufacturing and transport, many do not know details about when they will receive a dose.

Cases in Toronto have reached record-high levels driven by the contagious B.1.1.7 variant. Meanwhile, hospitalizations are the highest recorded and expected to increase.

Health experts have stressed that vaccinating workers is imperative to slowing the spread of the virus. Some of Toronto’s wealthiest neighbourhoods are seeing higher rates of vaccinations than areas of the city with higher rates of COVID-19, driven largely by workplace outbreaks.

Calls for paid sick leave have grown louder to help address workplace spread by allowing workers to stay home if they are experiencing systems.

Source : Toronto Star More