Toronto man assaults man and his dog, crashes into fire truck, assaults firefighter, Toronto police say

A man has been charged after he allegedly crashed into a fire truck and assaulted multiple people including a firefighter and a dog, Toronto police said. Officers received a call about a man who had allegedly assaulted a 34-year-old man and his dog in the Glenavy Avenue and Glazebrook Avenue area, near Bayview Avenue and Eglinton Avenue.Police report the suspect then fled in a white Volkswagen Jetta. Officers chased the suspect south on Bayview Avenue, but then lost sight of the car until the man crashed into a fence near Parkwoods Village Drive and Victoria Park Avenue, police said. Police say the man then got out of the car and assaulted another man with a belt. Getting back into his car, he drove south on Victoria Park and proceeded to crash into a fire truck on its way to an emergency, police said. The man assaulted a firefighter and fled on foot, according to the news release. Police found and arrested Aliasghar Behrouzi, 26, and charged him with a slew of charges including injuring an animal, two counts of assault, fail to stop/flight from police, and dangerous operation. He appeared in court at College Park on Monday. Police are asking anyone with video of the incident to come forward.Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 416-808-5300, Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS (8477), online at www.222tips.com, online on our Facebook Leave a Tip page, or text TOR and your message to CRIMES (274637).Cheyenne Bholla is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star's radio room in Toronto. Reach her via email: cbholla@thestar.ca

Toronto man assaults man and his dog, crashes into fire truck, assaults firefighter, Toronto police say

A man has been charged after he allegedly crashed into a fire truck and assaulted multiple people including a firefighter and a dog, Toronto police said.

Officers received a call about a man who had allegedly assaulted a 34-year-old man and his dog in the Glenavy Avenue and Glazebrook Avenue area, near Bayview Avenue and Eglinton Avenue.

Police report the suspect then fled in a white Volkswagen Jetta. Officers chased the suspect south on Bayview Avenue, but then lost sight of the car until the man crashed into a fence near Parkwoods Village Drive and Victoria Park Avenue, police said.

Police say the man then got out of the car and assaulted another man with a belt. Getting back into his car, he drove south on Victoria Park and proceeded to crash into a fire truck on its way to an emergency, police said.

The man assaulted a firefighter and fled on foot, according to the news release.

Police found and arrested Aliasghar Behrouzi, 26, and charged him with a slew of charges including injuring an animal, two counts of assault, fail to stop/flight from police, and dangerous operation.

He appeared in court at College Park on Monday.

Police are asking anyone with video of the incident to come forward.

Anyone with information is asked to contact police at 416-808-5300, Crime Stoppers anonymously at 416-222-TIPS (8477), online at www.222tips.com, online on our Facebook Leave a Tip page, or text TOR and your message to CRIMES (274637).

Cheyenne Bholla is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star's radio room in Toronto. Reach her via email: cbholla@thestar.ca

Source : Toronto Star More   

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Ottawa steps into legal dispute over Michigan’s order to shut down the Line 5 oil pipeline

OTTAWA—In a bid to keep a crucial oil pipeline flowing into Ontario, the federal government has stepped into the legal battle over Enbridge’s Line 5, arguing the threatened shutdown raises “grave concerns” about Canada’s relationship with the United States. Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan announced the move on Tuesday, one day before Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s May 12 deadline to shut down the portion of the pipeline that runs under the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron. “Line 5 is essential to our energy security,” O’Regan said in a statement Tuesday. “This pipeline is as important to Canada as it is to the U.S. It heats both Canadian and American homes. It supports both Canadian and American jobs,” he said. Michigan is currently in mediation with Enbridge, the Calgary-based company that owns Line 5, and the federal government has filed what’s called an “amicus” brief to that case, which is being heard in a U.S. federal court in the state. An “amicus” brief is a way for third parties to voice concerns over what’s at stake in a legal dispute. In its 20-page submission, the federal government argues the threatened shutdown of Line 5 “poses grave concerns” for Canada’s economy and energy supplies, as well as its ability to rely on treaties with the U.S.The government points to a treaty signed in 1977, in which the countries agreed not to interfere with cross-border oil pipelines like Line 5. Ottawa argues the Michigan court should prevent Line 5’s shutdown while discussions continue between Canada and the United States federal government.“This case raises concerns regarding the efficacy of the historic framework upon which the U.S.-Canada relationship has been successfully managed for generations,” the submission says. “It is essentially to the continued success of the relationship that both countries can trust that their reciprocal legal commitments will be fully honoured and implemented.” In a statement to the Star, Enbridge welcomed support from Ottawa and said the 1977 treaty was designed to ensure pipelines like Line 5 are “free of this type of interference from public authorities.” The company said it hopes the U.S. and Canada can work to keep the pipeline open until it is upgraded with Enbridge’s proposed $620-million project to encase it in a tunnel built into the lake bed in the straits. “In the meantime, Enbridge will not stop operating the pipeline unless ordered by a court of our regulator, which we view as highly unlikely,” the statement said. Whitmer was elected with a promise to shut down Line 5 because of the risk of an oil spill under the straits from the 68-year-old pipeline. In November, Whitmer revoked authorization for the line that was granted in 1953 and ordered Enbridge to shut it down by May 12.Line 5 carries 540,000 barrels of Canadian oil and natural gas liquids per day and runs from Wisconsin, through Michigan to Sarnia, Ont. It is the only pipeline that supplies propane to southern Ontario and provides much of central Canada’s supply of gasoline and heating fuel, according to a parliamentary committee that reported on the situation in April.Enbridge told the Star last week that there are no alternatives to “readily substitute” Line 5 if it shuts down.O’Regan’s department estimates 2,100 tanker trucks and 800 rail cares would be needed each day to make up for the lost pipeline — a scenario the minister says would result in higher greenhouse gas emissions for the transport of fossil fuels. Bob Larocque is president and chief executive officer of the Canadian Fuels Association, which represents oil refineries in Sarnia and Quebec that rely on Line 5 for their supplies. He called the pipeline an “absolutely critical piece of infrastructure” and said alternative pipelines to these refineries could only account for 60 per cent of what they get from Line 5. That means these refineries would need to ship oil by boat through the Great Lakes, or by rail and truck from oil suppliers in the United States or Western Canada, he said. Larocque said the association estimates this would increase annual greenhouse gas emissions by two to three megatonnes, the equivalent of adding roughly 400,000 to 600,000 gas-burning cars on the road. “All of those options are more costly than going into the pipeline,” Larocque added. “That will increase costs for the whole supply chain, including the consumers at the end” who gas up their cars in Ontario. Meanwhile, the federal Green party, which opposes all new oil and gas pipelines in Canada, supports Whitmer’s push to shut down Line 5. Green Leader Annamie Paul said it is “stoking fear” to suggest the shut down of Line 5 would threaten Canada’s energy security, and cited environmental organizations which say existing infrastructure pipelines should be able to make up for the loss of Line 5 for refineries in central Canada.It’s not clear that’s true, though. A 2018 report prepared for the National Wildlife Federation determ

Ottawa steps into legal dispute over Michigan’s order to shut down the Line 5 oil pipeline

OTTAWA—In a bid to keep a crucial oil pipeline flowing into Ontario, the federal government has stepped into the legal battle over Enbridge’s Line 5, arguing the threatened shutdown raises “grave concerns” about Canada’s relationship with the United States.

Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan announced the move on Tuesday, one day before Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s May 12 deadline to shut down the portion of the pipeline that runs under the Straits of Mackinac between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.

“Line 5 is essential to our energy security,” O’Regan said in a statement Tuesday.

“This pipeline is as important to Canada as it is to the U.S. It heats both Canadian and American homes. It supports both Canadian and American jobs,” he said.

Michigan is currently in mediation with Enbridge, the Calgary-based company that owns Line 5, and the federal government has filed what’s called an “amicus” brief to that case, which is being heard in a U.S. federal court in the state. An “amicus” brief is a way for third parties to voice concerns over what’s at stake in a legal dispute.

In its 20-page submission, the federal government argues the threatened shutdown of Line 5 “poses grave concerns” for Canada’s economy and energy supplies, as well as its ability to rely on treaties with the U.S.

The government points to a treaty signed in 1977, in which the countries agreed not to interfere with cross-border oil pipelines like Line 5. Ottawa argues the Michigan court should prevent Line 5’s shutdown while discussions continue between Canada and the United States federal government.

“This case raises concerns regarding the efficacy of the historic framework upon which the U.S.-Canada relationship has been successfully managed for generations,” the submission says.

“It is essentially to the continued success of the relationship that both countries can trust that their reciprocal legal commitments will be fully honoured and implemented.”

In a statement to the Star, Enbridge welcomed support from Ottawa and said the 1977 treaty was designed to ensure pipelines like Line 5 are “free of this type of interference from public authorities.”

The company said it hopes the U.S. and Canada can work to keep the pipeline open until it is upgraded with Enbridge’s proposed $620-million project to encase it in a tunnel built into the lake bed in the straits.

“In the meantime, Enbridge will not stop operating the pipeline unless ordered by a court of our regulator, which we view as highly unlikely,” the statement said.

Whitmer was elected with a promise to shut down Line 5 because of the risk of an oil spill under the straits from the 68-year-old pipeline. In November, Whitmer revoked authorization for the line that was granted in 1953 and ordered Enbridge to shut it down by May 12.

Line 5 carries 540,000 barrels of Canadian oil and natural gas liquids per day and runs from Wisconsin, through Michigan to Sarnia, Ont. It is the only pipeline that supplies propane to southern Ontario and provides much of central Canada’s supply of gasoline and heating fuel, according to a parliamentary committee that reported on the situation in April.

Enbridge told the Star last week that there are no alternatives to “readily substitute” Line 5 if it shuts down.

O’Regan’s department estimates 2,100 tanker trucks and 800 rail cares would be needed each day to make up for the lost pipeline — a scenario the minister says would result in higher greenhouse gas emissions for the transport of fossil fuels.

Bob Larocque is president and chief executive officer of the Canadian Fuels Association, which represents oil refineries in Sarnia and Quebec that rely on Line 5 for their supplies. He called the pipeline an “absolutely critical piece of infrastructure” and said alternative pipelines to these refineries could only account for 60 per cent of what they get from Line 5.

That means these refineries would need to ship oil by boat through the Great Lakes, or by rail and truck from oil suppliers in the United States or Western Canada, he said.

Larocque said the association estimates this would increase annual greenhouse gas emissions by two to three megatonnes, the equivalent of adding roughly 400,000 to 600,000 gas-burning cars on the road.

“All of those options are more costly than going into the pipeline,” Larocque added. “That will increase costs for the whole supply chain, including the consumers at the end” who gas up their cars in Ontario.

Meanwhile, the federal Green party, which opposes all new oil and gas pipelines in Canada, supports Whitmer’s push to shut down Line 5. Green Leader Annamie Paul said it is “stoking fear” to suggest the shut down of Line 5 would threaten Canada’s energy security, and cited environmental organizations which say existing infrastructure pipelines should be able to make up for the loss of Line 5 for refineries in central Canada.

It’s not clear that’s true, though. A 2018 report prepared for the National Wildlife Federation determined there “may be spare capacity” of almost 300,000 barrels per day — about half Line 5’s maximum capacity — in another Enbridge pipeline that carries oil from Michigan into Sarnia.

Paul said Tuesday that further analysis on capacity should have already been done, because the federal government has had advance warning of Michigan’s desire to shut down Line 5 and come up with contingency plans.

“We should never allow our energy security to be dependent upon the decisions of another country, particularly when they made it clear what they’re planning to do,” said Paul.

Alex Ballingall is an Ottawa-based reporter covering federal politics for the Star. Follow him on Twitter: @aballinga

Source : Toronto Star More   

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