Torstar names Brandon Grosvenor new Chief Revenue Officer

Torstar has appointed Brandon Grosvenor as its new Chief Revenue Officer, responsible for advertising sales revenue across the organization that owns the Toronto Star.Grosvenor, who had been serving as interim executive vice-president of advertising, has been with Torstar since 2015.He’s no stranger to the news business — before joining Torstar, Grosvenor worked in executive sales and marketing roles at a number of organizations including Postmedia Network Inc. and Sun Media, as well as Microsoft, CanWest and Yellow Pages. He has also sat on several boards including the Canadian Newspaper Association. Grosvenor said the past decade working in the news business has been tumultuous. He said while digital is clearly the future, now is not the time to abandon print.The advantage of digital is in knowing the audience, said Grosvenor, adding digital learning can be used for the print product. “We do have an opportunity in front of us,” he said. Grosvenor said he’s excited about the technical advancements Torstar has been making to keep up with the changing ad business, including a new data management platform. There are other significant deals in the works, to be announced soon, he said. “It’s going to be a pretty exciting ride.”Lorenzo DeMarchi, interim Torstar CEO, said Grosvenor’s experience in the news industry is an asset.“He understands where the business has come from. But he’s a very, very thoughtful and forward-thinking digital leader,” he said. Torstar is on a path from its traditional past to a digital future, DeMarchi said.“Brandon’s been a big part of driving the data side of the digital advertising products that we deliver,” he said.DeMarchi also noted the importance of print. In fact, the print side can benefit from digital data, he said.“We’ve got to continue to attend and nurture that business, but we’ve got to have our eyes firmly on the future.”Rosa Saba is a Toronto-based business reporter for the Star. Follow her on Twitter: @rosajsaba

Torstar names Brandon Grosvenor new Chief Revenue Officer

Torstar has appointed Brandon Grosvenor as its new Chief Revenue Officer, responsible for advertising sales revenue across the organization that owns the Toronto Star.

Grosvenor, who had been serving as interim executive vice-president of advertising, has been with Torstar since 2015.

He’s no stranger to the news business — before joining Torstar, Grosvenor worked in executive sales and marketing roles at a number of organizations including Postmedia Network Inc. and Sun Media, as well as Microsoft, CanWest and Yellow Pages. He has also sat on several boards including the Canadian Newspaper Association.

Grosvenor said the past decade working in the news business has been tumultuous. He said while digital is clearly the future, now is not the time to abandon print.

The advantage of digital is in knowing the audience, said Grosvenor, adding digital learning can be used for the print product.

“We do have an opportunity in front of us,” he said.

Grosvenor said he’s excited about the technical advancements Torstar has been making to keep up with the changing ad business, including a new data management platform. There are other significant deals in the works, to be announced soon, he said.

“It’s going to be a pretty exciting ride.”

Lorenzo DeMarchi, interim Torstar CEO, said Grosvenor’s experience in the news industry is an asset.

“He understands where the business has come from. But he’s a very, very thoughtful and forward-thinking digital leader,” he said.

Torstar is on a path from its traditional past to a digital future, DeMarchi said.

“Brandon’s been a big part of driving the data side of the digital advertising products that we deliver,” he said.

DeMarchi also noted the importance of print. In fact, the print side can benefit from digital data, he said.

“We’ve got to continue to attend and nurture that business, but we’ve got to have our eyes firmly on the future.”

Rosa Saba is a Toronto-based business reporter for the Star. Follow her on Twitter: @rosajsaba

Source : Toronto Star More   

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Conservatives protest ‘meeting in secret’ to make COVID-19 vaccinations mandatory in Parliament

OTTAWA—The federal Conservatives are challenging the decision-making process behind the move to require mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations on Parliament Hill.On Tuesday evening, the group of MPs charged with setting rules for the House of Commons declared that as of Nov. 22, all members of Parliament and their staff members will need to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to enter the Parliament buildings.While the decision was heralded by the Liberals and New Democratic Party, both of which have advocated for that approach, the Conservatives were initially silent.But on Wednesday, one of the Conservative MPs on the board of internal economy, which made the decision, said his party objects to the way it was made.“While we encourage everyone who can be vaccinated to get vaccinated, we cannot agree to seven MPs, meeting in secret, deciding which of the 338 MPs, just elected by Canadians, can enter the House of Commons to represent their constituents,” Blake Richards said in a written statement.It was unclear whether stating that the party “cannot agree” means the Tories intend to defy with the vaccination rules, or if the party will seek a way to formally challenge them, either in the Commons or in court.A party spokesperson did not immediately return phone and email inquiries from the Star on Wednesday seeking clarification of Richards’s statement. Richards wrote that the party supports vaccinations against COVID-19, and believes vaccines to be the best tool to end the pandemic. But, he said, the Conservatives also believe workplace safety can also be addressed with the use of rapid testing. He also said he would not discuss what happened during Tuesday’s private meeting of the board of internal economy, where the vaccination decision was made. The new policy will apply to the parliamentary buildings in downtown Ottawa known as the “precinct,” although people with valid medical exemptions from vaccination will also be allowed to enter by showing proof of a recent negative COVID-19 test.The debate around mandatory COVID-19 vaccination has been a challenging one for the Conservative caucus, and the party’s refusal to require its candidates to be vaccinated or to disclose their vaccination status became a wedge issue during this summer’s election campaign. On Wednesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is scheduled to have individual meetings with Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Green party parliamentary leader Elizabeth May to discuss priorities for the coming session.Stephanie Levitz is an Ottawa-based reporter covering federal politics for the Star. Follow her on Twitter: @StephanieLevitz

Conservatives protest ‘meeting in secret’ to make COVID-19 vaccinations mandatory in Parliament

OTTAWA—The federal Conservatives are challenging the decision-making process behind the move to require mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations on Parliament Hill.

On Tuesday evening, the group of MPs charged with setting rules for the House of Commons declared that as of Nov. 22, all members of Parliament and their staff members will need to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 in order to enter the Parliament buildings.

While the decision was heralded by the Liberals and New Democratic Party, both of which have advocated for that approach, the Conservatives were initially silent.

But on Wednesday, one of the Conservative MPs on the board of internal economy, which made the decision, said his party objects to the way it was made.

“While we encourage everyone who can be vaccinated to get vaccinated, we cannot agree to seven MPs, meeting in secret, deciding which of the 338 MPs, just elected by Canadians, can enter the House of Commons to represent their constituents,” Blake Richards said in a written statement.

It was unclear whether stating that the party “cannot agree” means the Tories intend to defy with the vaccination rules, or if the party will seek a way to formally challenge them, either in the Commons or in court.

A party spokesperson did not immediately return phone and email inquiries from the Star on Wednesday seeking clarification of Richards’s statement.

Richards wrote that the party supports vaccinations against COVID-19, and believes vaccines to be the best tool to end the pandemic. But, he said, the Conservatives also believe workplace safety can also be addressed with the use of rapid testing.

He also said he would not discuss what happened during Tuesday’s private meeting of the board of internal economy, where the vaccination decision was made.

The new policy will apply to the parliamentary buildings in downtown Ottawa known as the “precinct,” although people with valid medical exemptions from vaccination will also be allowed to enter by showing proof of a recent negative COVID-19 test.

The debate around mandatory COVID-19 vaccination has been a challenging one for the Conservative caucus, and the party’s refusal to require its candidates to be vaccinated or to disclose their vaccination status became a wedge issue during this summer’s election campaign.

On Wednesday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is scheduled to have individual meetings with Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh and Green party parliamentary leader Elizabeth May to discuss priorities for the coming session.

Stephanie Levitz is an Ottawa-based reporter covering federal politics for the Star. Follow her on Twitter: @StephanieLevitz

Source : Toronto Star More   

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