TTArtisan Launches 90mm f/1.25 Lens for Leica M-Mount

TTArtisan has announced a new Leica M-Mount rangefinder lens that, even upon close inspection, looks remarkably similar to a Leica optic. The company promises smooth transitions between objects and bokeh for a “dreamy picture” with ideal depth of field and background blur. As reported by Photo Rumors, the TTArtisan 90mm f/1.25 is a manual rangefinder […]

TTArtisan Launches 90mm f/1.25 Lens for Leica M-Mount

TTArtisan has announced a new Leica M-Mount rangefinder lens that, even upon close inspection, looks remarkably similar to a Leica optic. The company promises smooth transitions between objects and bokeh for a “dreamy picture” with ideal depth of field and background blur.

As reported by , the TTArtisan 90mm f/1.25 is a manual rangefinder lens that looks as close to a true Leica optic as the company has produced yet. The company says that its high speed and “unique aesthetics of its depth of focus” make the lens particularly suited for portraiture. It is also large and heavy, and as such the TTArtisan added a tripod collar in front of the lens mount to allow it to sit on a tripod without stressing the mount itself.

The optic has an angle of view of 27-degrees, measures 82mm wide by 97mm tall, and features a clicked aperture ring that ranges from f/1.25 at the wide end to f/16 fully closed. Gratefully, the lens supports macular linkage with Leica, Voigtlander, Minolta, and other paraxial M-port cameras.

Speaking of that 27-degree angle of view, TTArtisan says that even when a subject is close up, this angle avoids the “suffocating compression” that is found in large telephoto lenses and instead allows it to create a “natural and unique atmosphere.”

The lens has a minimum focusing distance of one meter, a 10-bladed aperture diaphragm, and is constructed of 11 elements in seven groups. TTArtisan also designed a set of four groups of glued lenses that it says better controls chromatic aberration.

“Dispersion is a common optical phenomenon, especially in large-aperture lenses. The M 90mm f1.25 lens uses 4 groups of glued lenses to significantly improve chromatic aberration, significantly improve resolution performance, and present excellent image quality,” the company writes.

“At large apertures, the artistic effect of rich layers and interweaving virtual and real is refreshing, and the transition between out-of-focus and in-focus is smooth, which outlines a dreamy picture of interweaving virtual and real,” the company continues.

TTArtisan also notes that with adapters, the lens can work as a manual focus lens on a range of cameras including Sony E, Nikon Z, Canon RF, Fuji GFX, Leica L, and Hasselblad mirrorless.

Below are a set of sample images provided by the company:

The TTArtisan 90mm f/1.25 M-Mount lens is available immediately from select TTArtisan distribution partners for $770. It should become available to purchase through other global distributors over time.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Gorgeous Starlapse Shot From Upcoming Launch Site of Ariane 6 Rocket

Watching any Milky Way timelapse is almost always an awe-inspiring experience, but add in the stellar location of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Ariane 6 rocket launch site and you’ve got a recipe for something truly special. As Digital Trends reports, the agency is currently preparing for the arrival of Europe’s next-generation launch vehicle. The […]

Gorgeous Starlapse Shot From Upcoming Launch Site of Ariane 6 Rocket

Watching any Milky Way timelapse is almost always an awe-inspiring experience, but add in the stellar location of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Ariane 6 rocket launch site and you’ve got a recipe for something truly special.

As reports, the agency is currently preparing for the arrival of Europe’s next-generation launch vehicle. The above starscape-filled timelapse was filmed around the launch base in French Guiana and lets you “imagine yourself stepping out of the launcher assembly building or standing on the launch pad in front of the 90-meter high mobile gantry, to look at the stars.”

The video opens with a breathtaking view of the Milky Way before shifting gears and showing off several of the night scenes around the ESA’s launch site in South America where Europe’s next-generation heavy-lift rocket will soon lift off from. Comprised of two versions, the Ariane 6 is a modular three-stage launcher (Solid-Cryogenic-Crogenic) and is configured with an A62 with two strap-on boosters and an A64 with four boosters. The entire Ariane 6 sits at just over 60 meters tall (196.85 feet), which is just about the same height as SpaceX’s Falcon 9.

The European Space Agency says the new rocket will weigh nearly 900 tons when launched with a full payload that is “roughly equivalent to one-and-a-half Airbus A380 passenger airplanes.” The video below shows what this launch mission should look like once the rocket finally gets started.

According to the ESA, the launch of the Ariane 6 is comprised of three stages: the two or four strap-on boosters, a core stage, and the upper stage. The core stage propels the Ariane 6 for the first 10 minutes of flight where either the two or four boosters will provide additional thrust at liftoff. The upper stage will be powered by the re-ignitable Vinci engine allowing the Ariane 6 to reach a range of orbits on a single mission to deliver more payloads, with the upper stage burning up two or more times to reach the required orbit. Once the payload has been separated, the rocket will burn a final time to deorbit the upper stage to mitigate space debris.

Exploded view

Sitting at the top of the rocket is the 20 meters (65.6 feet) tall and 5.4 meters (17.7 feet) diameter Ariane 6 fairing which will contain the various payloads and protect them from any thermal, acoustic, or aerodynamic stress during the ascent to space. This section has only recently arrived at the launch facility and will undergo a series of tests before its maiden voyage into outer space. While the rocket was initially scheduled to launch back in 2020, multiple delays — including some caused by the global coronavirus pandemic — have caused the mission to be pushed back until the spring of this upcoming year (2022).

Source : Peta Pixel More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.