Two Sydney hospitals battling coronavirus outbreaks

Liverpool Hospital is dealing with its third major outbreak, while there are more than a dozen cases at the Mater.

Two Sydney hospitals battling coronavirus outbreaks

Two Sydney hospitals are dealing with coronavirus outbreaks, as health workers are being asked to come out of retirement ahead of a surge in cases next month.

Liverpool Hospital is dealing with its third major outbreak with 25 cases in four different wards including orthopaedic, renal, and geriatric.

Twelve patients and three staff in the orthopaedic ward are infected, one patient and one staff member in the renal ward, three patients and a staff member in neurology and four patients in the geriatric ward.

READ MORE:

A total of 28 staff are in isolation, and all workers who have tested positive are fully vaccinated, a spokesperson for South Western Local Health District said.

"An ICU nurse who tested positive in the days preceding the exposures listed was an isolate case and is not connected to the above cases," the spokesperson said.

Cases are also spreading at The Mater on the North Shore with 14 new infections.

"Of the cases, five are patients, eight are staff members, and one is a carer," a Mater spokesperson said.

"Immediately after becoming aware of these cases, The Mater commenced testing of patients and staff who may have been exposed to COVID-19.

"At this stage, no further cases have been identified."

READ MORE:

The Mater Hospital on Sydney's North Shore.

It comes as thousands of retired or temporarily unemployed health care workers are being asked to come back to bolster the COVID-19 pandemic response across the state ahead of an anticipated surge in hospitalisations in October.

The pandemic response sub-register has been doubled to allow more than 55,000 doctors, nurses, psychologists and dentists to return to practice.

These also include midwives, pharmacists, diagnostic radiographers, occupational therapists, optometrists, physiotherapists and podiatrists.

NSW has also reached out to Western Australia seeking assistance from those able to help.

The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency created its sub-register in April 2020 in response to the coronavirus pandemic and has 26,000 practitioners.

It has now established a new pandemic response sub-register for 2021 allowing nearly 29,000 practitioners who recently stopped practising to be eligible to return.

The surge workforce will make more practitioners available to help with the pandemic response if they choose to do so.

Source : 9 News More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

World celebrates International Day of Sign Languages

Today is the International Day of Sign Languages, which marks a day to support and safeguard the linguistic and cultural identity of all deaf people and other sign language users.

World celebrates International Day of Sign Languages

Today is the International Day of Sign Languages, which marks a day to support and safeguard the linguistic and cultural identity of all deaf people and other sign language users.

This year's theme is 'We Sign for Human Rights', which aims to show how both deaf and hearing impaired people worldwide can unite to advocate for the recognition of the right to use sign languages in all areas.

READ MORE:

Data from the 2016 Census showed that 11,682 people used Auslan (Australian sign language), which has increased from 5306 in 2001.

For the first time, the question asking 'Does (person) use a language other than English at home?', included Auslan as a language prompt in the 2021 Census.

https://twitter.com/UN/status/1440888906170392576?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfwhttps://twitter.com/yarratrams/status/1440905291340689411?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfwhttps://twitter.com/HawthornFC/status/1440958056993415168?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Sign language interpreter Mike 'Mikey' Webb said there are still some stigmas that need to be overcome.

"My parents (were) being ignored. So if they were trying to communicate stuff they were always put in the too hard basket because people generally couldn't communicate with them," Mr Webb told 9news.com.au.

"To me if you give a deaf person access, I think the general community would be really surprised by what this community can offer."

The World Federation of the Deaf says there are more than 70 million deaf people in the world, with over 80 per cent living in developing countries.

READ MORE:

Mr Webb frequently does sign language interpretation for COVID-19 press conferences and says they can be quite fast-paced.

"You've definitely got to be on your game and when it comes to doing those conferences and stuff like that you need a really good understanding and knowledge of what's being talked about," he said.

Associate Professor of Linguistics at Monash University, Louisa Willoughby, said it is also important that deaf people from migrant and refugee communities are not overlooked.

"Where the challenge is is that a lot of deaf people from migrant backgrounds are people who've often just sort of stayed at home in the country they've come from," Associate Professor Willoughby said.

"They haven't necessarily learnt their country's sign language and they might communicate with something that we call a home sign system."

Associate Professor Willoughby said it can be very challenging for those people to learn Auslan.

She added that the International Day of Sign Languages was integral for recognising that "sign languages are real languages".

"They're very complex languages. They're a lot more than just gesture systems and that they are an incredibly valuable thing for deaf people to know," she said.

Source : 9 News More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.