Uber launches new ride-share option during COVID-19 lockdown

Ride-share giant Uber has launched an option on its app that allows people to book a driver for a period of at least one hour.

Uber launches new ride-share option during COVID-19 lockdown

Ride-share giant Uber has launched an option on its app that allows people to book a driver for a period of at least one hour.

Uber said its new Hourly Driver option was meant to help people who still needed to undertake essential travel or to get all of their errands done in one go.

"From a trip from the office, to the chemist, to the supermarket to home, this new option is designed to give riders more peace of mind by having fewer interactions with people, and a handy car to help transport things as they buy them," an Uber spokesperson said.

After the minimum initial hour, a fare will be charged on a prorated basis per minute.

The option is being trialled in Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide and the Gold Coast.

Uber has been publicly urging people to heed health warnings and stay home, restricting outdoor trips to essential travel only.

Source : 9 News More   

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How your state or territory is dealing with schooling for term two

It's back to pencils, back to books and back to teachers for students in most states with plans now in place to get classrooms operating by the end of May.

How your state or territory is dealing with schooling for term two

It's back to pencils, back to books and back to teachers for students in most states with plans now in place to get classrooms operating by the end of May.

The medical advice has consistently been that children are less likely to contract and spread COVID-19 than adults however some states continue to play it safe, encouraging children to stay at home unless absolutely necessary.

The continued debate over children and teacher returning to school for term two  - and at times clash between federal and state - has caused significant confusion and debate since the COVID-19 pandemic hit Australia almost two months ago.

Here is a breakdown of each state and territory's approach over coming days and weeks.

NSW

NSW is planning a staged return to classrooms from May 11 along with the easing of other lockdown restrictions.

"If the first two weeks go well, there's no reason we can't expedite all students having full-time face-to-face teaching by the end of May, that's our target," Premier Gladys Berejiklian told reporters on Monday.

Safety measures will include staggered start and finish times to reduce the numbers of adults coming into contact with each other.

Queensland

School students across Queensland will be back in the classroom by the end of May, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has announced.

Kindergarten, Prep, Years 1, 11 and 12 will go back to school from May 11, with a decision about further returns to be ruled on by May 15.

However, schools are expected to be fully operational from May 25 if the number of new COVID-19 diagnoses remains low, Ms Palaszczuk added.

"I understand that it's been a lot of stress on everybody," she said.

"We know that there may be some hiccups along the way but this is a measured and responsible plan that we're taking to the Queensland community."

Any rise in cases between now and then would see plans change.

"If there is an outbreak or if there's community transmission then our plans may change, I have to be honest about that," Ms Palaszczuk added.

Victoria

But Victoria continues to hold its hardline stance against reopening schools, even in the face of attacks from the federal government.

One school in Victoria and another in NSW are closed on Monday for cleaning after one person at each tested positive for coronavirus.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, who came under fire from the federal education minister on Sunday, said the case of a teacher coming down with coronavirus showed how fragile the situation was.

But he dismissed the comments from Dan Tehan on live television and their later withdrawal as "ancient history".

"Look, comments were made yesterday morning, a statement was issued after that and that's the end of the matter as far as I'm concerned," Mr Andrews told reporters.

ACT

The ACT has issued similar advice, and closed all its public schools apart from nine designated hubs where parents who have registered a need can send their children.

The ACT government has said it will look at a staged return to classrooms during term two if the circumstances allow.

Queensland schools online learning down.

SA, WA and NT

Schools in South Australia, Western Australia and the Northern Territory have been open for learning as normal in term two, although attendance has been down.

WA has strongly encouraged Year 11 and 12 students to attend classes in person and banned parents from school grounds.

Tasmania

Tasmania also continues to advise parents to keep their children at home unless they have no other choice.

The state's government has taken a strict approach to easing any lockdown and social distancing restrictions and Tasmanians have been warned the situation is unlikely to change any time soon.

Health Minister Sarah Courtney indicated it was highly unlikely Tasmania's COVID-19 statewide restrictions would be eased before mid-May.

Source : 9 News More   

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