US city bans no-knock warrants after woman’s death

WASHINGTON The city of Louisville in US state of Kentucky banned “no-knock” warrants Friday after a black woman was killed in her home earlier this year by police, sparking widespread outrage. Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old health care worker, was killed by police in March, shot eight times in her home as police officers and her …

US city bans no-knock warrants after woman’s death

WASHINGTON

The city of Louisville in US state of Kentucky banned “no-knock” warrants Friday after a black woman was killed in her home earlier this year by police, sparking widespread outrage.

Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old health care worker, was killed by police in March, shot eight times in her home as police officers and her boyfriend exchanged gunfire while police attempted to carry out a drug sting. The officers requested and were granted a no-knock warrant by a local judge.

The Louisville City Council voted 26-0 to pass what is known as Breonna’s Law on Thursday. It prohibits any local law enforcement from seeking or participating in the execution of a no-knock warrant, which allow officers to enter a premise without prior notification, according to the local WLKY television network.

It further mandates officers wear body cameras while executing a search warrant after the three who fatally shot Taylor did not have them.

Mayor Greg Fischer signed the measure into law on Friday, describing the law as a “victory.”

Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were inside when the plainclothes officers used a battering ram on the apartment’s front door to force their way into her residence, according to Taylor’s legal team.

Taylor and Walker were sleeping at the time and believed “their house was being invaded,” Ben Crump, one of the attorneys representing Taylor’s family.

Officers and Walker, who Crump said is a licensed gun owner, then exchanged fire with one officer being struck. The lawsuit alleges Walker thought the residence was being broken into when he opened fire in self-defense, saying he called 911 at the time.

Crump said officers shot 25 to 30 rounds into the apartment from multiple positions including windows, the front door and patio doors, describing the gunshots as “a volley of bullets from every direction.”

“They had a right to try to protect themselves against a home invasion. In fact, they called 911. Kenny, who is a licensed registered gun owner, in an attempt to protect his castle, to protect his woman, and protect himself, got his gun, and as they came through the front door he shot,” Crump said, referring to Walker.

Source : Voice of South Asia More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

UN regrets US president’s sanctions on ICC

GENEVA The UN human rights office said Friday it regrets a set of sanctions authorized by the administration of US President Donald Trump against International Criminal Court (ICC) officials who prosecute American troops. Rupert Colville, a spokesman for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, in a video press briefing expressed the regret and impact …

UN regrets US president’s sanctions on ICC

GENEVA

The UN human rights office said Friday it regrets a set of sanctions authorized by the administration of US President Donald Trump against International Criminal Court (ICC) officials who prosecute American troops.

Rupert Colville, a spokesman for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, in a video press briefing expressed the regret and impact the US measures may have on the investigations and trials underway in the ICC.

“The independence of the ICC and its ability to operate without interference must be guaranteed so that it can decide matters without any improper influence, inducements, pressures, threats or interference, direct or indirect, from any quarter, or for any reason,” said Colville.

He noted: “Victims of gross human rights violations and serious violations of international humanitarian law and their families have the right to redress and to the truth.”

“The measures announced impact not only the ICC officials but also impact their family members.”

He observed that in terms what the US is saying, the investigation in question is in Afghanistan.

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany had said in a statement Thursday, “As part of President Donald J. Trump’s steadfast commitment to protecting American service members and defending our national sovereignty,” he had authorized economic sanctions against ICC officials directly engaged with any effort to investigate or prosecute US personnel without the consent of the United States.

She said Trump also authorized the expansion of visa restrictions against ICC officials and family members.

The Trump administration believes there is “corruption and misconduct at the highest levels” of the ICC Office of the Prosecutor.

The administration, therefore, questioned the integrity of investigations into American service members, according to the spokeswoman.

ICC officials involved in an investigation about whether US soldiers committed war crimes in Afghanistan after a preliminary examination in 2017 showed “reasonable ground,” the court said.

“The United States is not a State Party to the Rome Statute and has repeatedly rejected the International Criminal Court’s assertions of jurisdiction over United States personnel,” she added, calling ICC’s actions “an attack on the rights of the American people” and threatening “to infringe upon US national sovereignty,” McEnany said.

She emphasized that although the US reiterated its call a couple of times, the ICC “has taken no action to reform itself” and “continued to pursue politically-motivated investigations” against Washington and its allies.

“We are concerned that adversary nations are manipulating the International Criminal Court by encouraging these allegations against United States personnel,” she said.

Source : Voice of South Asia More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.