Vaonis Launches the 1050mm, 61MP Hyperia Telescope Camera

Vaonis has announced the Hyperia telescope camera, a 165-pound personal observatory that leverages a 61-megapixel sensor and sets it behind a massive 1050mm lens that is mechanically driven to allow for stunning photos of astronomical objects. Vaonis has been producing telescope and camera hybrids for some time and is perhaps best known for its Vespera […]

Vaonis Launches the 1050mm, 61MP Hyperia Telescope Camera

Vaonis has announced the Hyperia telescope camera, a 165-pound personal observatory that leverages a 61-megapixel sensor and sets it behind a massive 1050mm lens that is mechanically driven to allow for stunning photos of astronomical objects.

Vaonis has been producing telescope and camera hybrids for some time and is perhaps best known for its Vespera and Stellina smart telescopes launched in 2018 and 2021 respectively. Both of those prior telescopes were smaller and therefore used smaller sensors, but with the Hyperia, Vaonis super-sized the whole package.

It weighs a hefty 165 pounds (75 kilograms), which is nearly seven times as heavy as the Stellina telescope, and offers more than twice the focal length throw with its 1050mm f/5 apochromatic triplet lens. The 61-megapixel sensor is the full-frame Sony IMX455 monochrome sensor. This backside-illuminated sensor boasts what Vaonis says is enhanced sensitivity with “91% quantum efficiency.”

Hyperia is made of Zicral, an alloy that Vaonis says is used in the aerospace industry for its outstanding mechanical performance and exceptional resistance to extreme conditions.

Combining the most recent components on the market with the constantly improving technology that Vaonis has been developing since its creation in 2016, Hyperia offers exceptional observation quality, like a domestic Hubble, as well as a small footprint, enhanced protection against hazards exterior and unparalleled ease of use.

Vaonis designed the Hyperia to be modular and upgradeable over time, so even though the 61-megapixel sensor is excellent now and should be for many years, the company says that its “evolutionary system” means that users can replace the existing sensor with the latest technology on the market as it becomes available.

Hyperia is equipped with Direct Drive motorization, which the company says is the same as those used in the major professional observatories. This technology allows for unmatched pointing speeds and perfect sidereal tracking.

When closed, the Hyperia stands five feet, six inches tall. When open, it extends to a massive six feet, nine inches tall.

Below are a few example photos taken with the Hyperion system. They have been scaled down for veiwing online, but the largest file is 9,450 x 6,102 pixels in size.

Clearly designed to appeal to the most discerning astronomical photographers, the fully modular Hyperion is available in three colors, made to order and designed to a customer’s specific requests.

Buyers will be able to closely follow the manufacture of the “mini-observatory” with the Vaonis team. Orders will only be available through the Vaonis website and will start at €45,000 (about $52,760). Each telescope system will involve an estimated waiting period of between 12 and 18 months.

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Hotel Introduces Fee to Deter Photographers From Crowding its Venue

A family-run hotel in the United Kingdom that is situated on a picturesque cliffside has received criticism for introducing a £200 ($273) members-only fee designed to protect it from hoards of tourists who are only seeking a photo of the sunset. The Druidstone Hotel overlooks St. Brides Bay in Wales, United Kingdom, and has been […]

Hotel Introduces Fee to Deter Photographers From Crowding its Venue

A family-run hotel in the United Kingdom that is situated on a picturesque cliffside has received criticism for introducing a £200 ($273) members-only fee designed to protect it from hoards of tourists who are only seeking a photo of the sunset.

The Druidstone Hotel overlooks St. Brides Bay in Wales, United Kingdom, and has been a popular destination for holiday goers. However, the owner of the hotel, Angus Bell, has expressed his frustration after the venue has become inundated with tourists after images taken of the sunset from its cliffside bar were shared on Instagram, reports BBC.

As more people have chosen to spend holidays without flying abroad due to COVID restrictions, locations like the St. Brides Bay where the Druidstone Hotel sits have received a large influx of tourists.

The hotel has 10 bedrooms and a clifftop bar that caters to its guests. However, as more people have been trying to enjoy the grand views and take photographs of their travels, it has left the hotel regularly filled with visitors who only come in for the photo opportunity, which has, in turn, created long waiting times for the hotel’s paying guests.

 

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To cope with the increased numbers, Bell recently introduced a fee to deter those who only want to stop by and briefly enjoy the hotel and its views. Bell has also said that the membership may increase to £400 ($546) with additional benefits, such as an increased bar tab facility.

Non-members are still able to book rooms or a table in the restaurant, but the membership concerns the hotel’s bar — the preferred venue for watching — or photographing 00– the sunset over the Bay.

In its early days, the hotel used to be a members’ club and welcomed regular visitors and cultivated a “bohemian atmosphere” that was enjoyed by musicians, actors, and artists, and others, reports.

Not unexpected, the new membership fee faces open criticism of the hotel, but Bell doesn’t intend to change his mind about imposing the fee. That said, The Druidstone Hotel has noted that it doesn’t want to price out those who really love the place but are unable to now afford it, and suggests getting in touch directly in such cases.

“We’re learning to say, no, learning what to do to keep staff and guests happy and make sure we are less stressed”, says Bell.


Image credits: Header photo licensed via Depositphotos.

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