Vivo Designs Detachable, Double-Sided Pop-Up Smartphone Camera

Vivo has designed a detachable pop-up camera system that consists of three total cameras and two flashes and runs on its own built-in battery. Detachable smartphone cameras are not a new concept, at least in the design phase. For example, Vivo itself explored the idea of a small detachable phone camera with its own touch-display […]

Vivo Designs Detachable, Double-Sided Pop-Up Smartphone Camera

Vivo has designed a detachable pop-up camera system that consists of three total cameras and two flashes and runs on its own built-in battery.

Detachable smartphone cameras are not a new concept, at least in the design phase. For example, Vivo itself explored the idea of a small detachable phone camera with its own touch-display earlier this month, which was built upon a 2020 prototype that showed a smartphone design with a detachable front camera.

This time, Vivo designed a double-sided pop-up camera that may be the most advanced and practical design yet. The patent — — shows a Vivo smartphone with a full-screen design and a pop-up camera situated in the top right corner.

The system can be used for selfies and video calls and has a dual-camera integrated onto the back of the pop-up system. This acts as the main camera, giving users a total of three cameras and two flashes.

The pop-up camera can be fully removed and fixed at different angles thanks to a hinge. Users can make the most of the camera by placing it on a flat surface to take photos from a distance — similar to using a camera with a remote shutter — or by holding it in hand as a selfie stick.

This detachable camera system has a built-in battery which means it can be used independently from the smartphone. If the battery runs low, users can attach it back onto the smartphone to charge it from the main body’s battery. This is done using a sliding rail, with additional magnets to prevent the camera from accidentally detaching.

As it’s a double-sided camera, the system detects which side the user is on. This design also gives Vivo the option to add a Dual-View video function in the future.

LetsGoDigital explains that the patent doesn’t mention what type of cameras are to be used with this design but instead it is stated that the camera will have different apertures “for all-round photography possibilities.”

With numerous detachable camera system patents under its belt, it is seemingly increasingly likely that Vivo will at some point manufacture a finished smartphone that tries it, though it’s unclear how successful such a design would be. There are no doubt practical applications that a removable module would certainly make easier, but the increased possibility of losing those critical parts may outweigh the benefits.

Vivo isn’t the only one who is testing the design waters with a removable camera system. Oppo has also patented a detachable camera module design, although it is considerably bulkier in comparison to Vivo’s. Samsung has considered integrating a smartphone camera into its S Pen.

The full patent application can be viewed on .

Source : Peta Pixel More   

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This Was ‘Instagram vs Reality’ in 1909

If you’re tired of the unrealistic beauty standards set by all the edited pictures on Instagram and long for a return to “the good old days,” here is some bad news: people have been “Photoshopping” portraits for just about as long as photography has been around. Here is an interesting before-and-after example found in an […]

This Was ‘Instagram vs Reality’ in 1909

If you’re tired of the unrealistic beauty standards set by all the edited pictures on Instagram and long for a return to “the good old days,” here is some bad news: people have been “Photoshopping” portraits for just about as long as photography has been around.

Here is an interesting before-and-after example found in an instructional photography book published over a century ago:

Before (top) and after (bottom) retouching.

The example is from the Complete Self-Instructing Library of Practical Photography, a classic 10-volume collection that instructed photographers on a wide range of photography subjects. It was published by the American School of Art and Photography and edited by the school’s president, James B. Schriever.

Volume 10, which contains these retouching illustrations and comparisons, is about “Negative Retouching, Etching and Modeling.”

Read also: Victorian Influencers ‘Facetuned’ Photos Long Before Instagram

The introduction of the book explains how the evolution of photography led to a demand for photo retouching.

In delivering finished work to your customers, you do not hand them the photographic negatives, but the prints made from these negatives.

In the early days of photography, when the so-called “wet-plate process” was in use, prints were made direct from the negative without any alteration whatever, as the wet-plate rendered softer effects than are obtainable with the ready prepared dry-plate. The imperfections were less visible, and at that time the general public were satisfied with an exact likeness of themselves.

With the advent of the dry-plate, however, the defects in the human face became more apparent on the negative, and there arose a demand for a greater softening of the lines and a removal of the more objectionable imperfections. At first, these imperfections or blemishes were removed, by means of a brush and color, from each individual print.

So numerous, however, were these imperfections, and so irksome became the labor of eliminating them from the print, that the photographer was compelled to devise some means whereby he could apply these remedies direct to his negative so that each print made from the negative would have these blemishes eliminated. The results of these endeavors led to retouching the negative.

Topics covered in subsequent chapters include applying lead to negatives, blending, modeling, penciling, and etching.

Photographers’ retouching tools at the time included an easel, magnifying glass, lead holder, lead, etching knife, spotting brush, retouching fluid, negative varnish, and etching paste.

Pencils were used to remove imperfections and blend highlights, shadows, and halftones. Etching knives were used to reduce highlights and subdue/remove “objectionable” parts of photos.

“By the combination of etching and retouching — i. e., by the use of the knife and pencil — you etch and model, and with these two instruments you can make any alteration you desire on the negative,” the book states. “Highlights on the bones in the neck may be cut down and subdued, thick necks made thin, excessive drapery removed, crooked noses straightened, shadows accentuated, hair added, backgrounds altered, objectionable portion removed, figures taken from groups, etc.”

Read also: This is What Victorian ‘Photoshopped’ Photos Look Like Up Close

Here are before-and-after examples of these types of edits found in the book:

Removal of Freckles

Straightening Crossed Eyes

Opening Closed Eyes

Reducing Thick Necks

Removing a Child

Adding ‘Drapery’ to a Woman’s Outfit

‘Reducing Size of Stout Subjects’

While cultural norms and photographic technologies have changed quite a bit over the past century, the demand for heavily altered photographs was already strong even at the tail end of the Victorian Era. And throughout the history of photography, photographers have been bending over backward to satisfy customer requests regarding their portraits, albeit using very different tools and workflows.

The Complete Self-instructing Library Of Practical Photography is still being published these days, but as its now in the public domain, you can also read it for free and download it over at the Internet Archive.

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