VOTD: Original ‘Halloween’ Mask Creator Reveals How William Shatner Became Michael Myers

One of the most well-known pieces of movie trivia is that the mask worn by the seemingly invincible slasher Michael Myers in Halloween is a repurposed mask of William Shatner as James T. Kirk from Star Trek. However, what no one has ever really heard is the process by which the sci-fi costume accessory was […] The post VOTD: Original ‘Halloween’ Mask Creator Reveals How William Shatner Became Michael Myers appeared first on /Film.

VOTD: Original ‘Halloween’ Mask Creator Reveals How William Shatner Became Michael Myers

One of the most well-known pieces of movie trivia is that the mask worn by the seemingly invincible slasher Michael Myers in Halloween is a repurposed mask of William Shatner as James T. Kirk from Star Trek. However, what no one has ever really heard is the process by which the sci-fi costume accessory was turned into the iconic horror mask. But that changed last week as Halloween documentary short producer Sean Clark revealed a video where Tommy Lee Wallace shows exactly how he created the Michael Myers mask back in 1978. It’s crazy how insanely simple it is.

Making of Michael Myers Mask

As Sean Clark explains in the YouTube description for the video, this little featurette shot back in 2014 was intended to be included on the box set. For whatever reason, it didn’t end up in that box set, but now it’s online for everyone to enjoy.

This was exactly how Tommy Lee Wallace created the original Halloween mask, and for some reason, none of the sequels that followed could replicate the unsettling look of the original mask. The only exception is the recent Halloween sequel from 2018 that picked up 40 years after the events of the original movie. Director David Gordon Green was able to get the style of the original mask accurately recreated, but with some clear aging after being hidden away for four decades.

It just goes to show you that a big budget isn’t required to create something iconic in the world of cinema. Sometimes all it takes is a little creativity and ingenuity, and you could have yourself the next classic movie monster on your hands.

This is a nice distraction to hold us over until Halloween Kills arrives, which is currently still set for October 16, 2020.

The post VOTD: Original ‘Halloween’ Mask Creator Reveals How William Shatner Became Michael Myers appeared first on /Film.

Source : Slash Film More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

The Quarantine Stream: ‘Haunted’ is Trash Television at Its Absolute Finest

(Welcome to The Quarantine Stream, a new series where the /Film team shares what they’ve been watching while social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic.) The Seres: Haunted Where You Can Stream It: Netflix The Pitch: “Real” people and their “real” friends and family gather together in front of cameras to share their “real” experiences with the supernatural, […] The post The Quarantine Stream: ‘Haunted’ is Trash Television at Its Absolute Finest appeared first on /Film.

The Quarantine Stream: ‘Haunted’ is Trash Television at Its Absolute Finest

(Welcome to , a new series where the /Film team shares what they’ve been watching while social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic.)

The Seres: Haunted

Where You Can Stream It: Netflix

The Pitch: “Real” people and their “real” friends and family gather together in front of cameras to share their “real” experiences with the supernatural, the paranormal, and other things that go bump in the night. As they share, shockingly high quality re-enactments play out, transforming their stories into horror movies on fast-forward. I dare you to just watch one episode and not want to binge the whole damn thing.

Why It’s Essential Viewing: Look, there’s nothing on television more inherently trashy than “true stories told through cheesy re-enactments.” But here’s the thing: nothing is more addictive. And here’s the other thing: what if someone made one of those, but the cheesy re-enactments were actually glossy and cinematic and felt like scenes from an actual movie with a budget? Haunted does that, letting its subjects share their stories of ghosts, demons, and aliens while backing them up with re-enactments that are spooky and atmospheric and cinematic. In other words: this is trash, but it’s trash wearing a bunch of perfume and an Armani suit. And I mean that as a compliment!

Depending on your personal feelings and perspective, Haunted is one of three shows, each of them worth watching. Let’s break them down.

If you don’t believe in the supernatural at all, Haunted may come across as a completely scripted show operating under the guise of being based on a series of true stories. In fact, some episodes, like season 1’s “The Slaughterhouse,” may set off your bullshit detector from the opening moments (others have done deeper dives on this). If that’s the case, I’m not mad at all! I appreciate the hucksterism of selling fictional tales as the truth. It’s my kind of sleaze. Plus, the talking head segments are well-acted enough to lend the stories actual dramatic weight and those aforementioned re-enactments are a blast. The combination of the weighty narration and the freaky horror scenes feel like you’re watching an entire horror movie in less than 30 minutes. It’s fully satisfying as a series of haunted house tales abridged for your short attention span.

But what if the stories are true? And by that, I don’t mean factual. You don’t have to believe in ghosts or demons to believe that these folks are convinced these events happened to them and that their trauma – even if it’s built on something that doesn’t hold water – is genuine. This lends a very real and very strange power to the talking head segments, where the storyteller sits in a circle with family members and friends to share their story, confessing what they’ve been through and coming clean about how they’re hurting. We watch as those gathered ask follow-up questions, offer sympathetic nods, and just plain be there for someone who needs someone to listen and to believe. In fact, the least supernatural story of the bunch, season 2’s “Cult of Torture,” is confirmed to be very real. Of course, this is all taking place while the gory and gooey re-enactments turn their trauma into a mini horror movie, but hey, I never said this wasn’t trash!

The third option? Everyone on camera is a liar, but the producers of the show think it’s real and spent millions of dollars selling this nonsense as the real deal. And that’s just hilarious.

So pick your option. If you want something easy to binge and totally shameless, you can’t do much better than Haunted. The 12 episodes currently available on Netflix will vanish in just a few sittings.

The post The Quarantine Stream: ‘Haunted’ is Trash Television at Its Absolute Finest appeared first on /Film.

Source : Slash Film More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.