What Citizenship Does A Baby Have If It Is Born On A flight?

Over the years, there have been rare instances of mothers giving birth to their offsprings while in the…

What Citizenship Does A Baby Have If It Is Born On A flight?

Over the years, there have been rare instances of mothers giving birth to their offsprings while in the air. When these occurrences happen, the citizenship of the baby comes into question.

British Airways has seen its fair share of births on its aircraft over the years. Photo: Getty Images

Across the nations

There are several points to consider when considering the nationality of the child if they are born on a plane. The three key factors are the nationality of the child’s parents, where the plane is located at the time of birth, and where the aircraft was registered.

The parents’ citizenship can usually determine what a baby’s nationality should be, regardless of where the birth took place. However, some countries allow citizenship if there are births over their airspace. According to The Points Guy, the United States grants citizenship to births within 12 nmi of its borders. Even deliveries within the sky come under these laws.

Nonetheless, birth tourism – where mothers purposely go on vacation to have a child in that country so that they can claim citizenship has forced several governments to amend their laws. Subsequently, it is increasingly harder for parents to obtain citizenship documents from local authorities.

No European nation currently grants unconditional birthright citizenship. Other nations such as Qatar also don’t offer the same privilege. In these instances, the nationality of the child is then usually based on their parents’ documents.

Qatar Boring 777-300 Getty
Qatar Airways had a baby born on one of its Boeing 777s earlier this year. Photo: Getty Images

Aircraft registration

According to The Telegraph, if the flight the baby was born on is from a country signed to the Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness agreement, then the child will be a national of where the aircraft is registered. This factor could give way to a whole heap of confusion for parents as the plane could be registered to a country that they have no connection to whatsoever.

However, after looking further into the technicalities of this rule, The Points Guy highlights that this is most likely a backup plan if the other two routes fail.

Once in a blue moon

Nonetheless, this predicament is not something that is often a concern for parents. Measures are in place to prevent them from happening. Carriers usually do not allow heavily pregnant women to fly on their services for health and safety reasons.

The Telegraph reports that NHS guidance recommends the following:

“Most airlines will not allow you to travel after week 36 of pregnancy, or week 32 if you’re pregnant with twins or multiples.”

aircraft
It is not common practice for babies to be delivered onboard. Photo: Getty Images

Regardless, these instances can happen. Famously, in 1991, Deborah Owen gave birth on a British Airways flight back to London Gatwick after working in Accra, Ghana. Her child, Shona Kirsty Yves (SKY) was born over the skies of France but was granted British citizenship.

Just last week, a baby was born on a repatriation flight to Lagos, Nigeria from Dubai, UAE. Altogether, much like how nationality is determined for births abroad, citizenship for deliveries in the air is subject to various local and personal factors.

What are your thoughts about the nationality of babies if they are born in the air? Do you know of any stories of someone giving birth on a plane? Let us know what you think in the comment section.

Source : Simple Flying More   

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Air Serbia Considers Acquiring Planes For Post-COVID-19 Expansion

Serbia’s Finance Minister Siniša Mali said this week that the state could support Air Serbia in acquiring new…

Air Serbia Considers Acquiring Planes For Post-COVID-19 Expansion

Serbia’s Finance Minister Siniša Mali said this week that the state could support Air Serbia in acquiring new aircraft for a post-COVID expansion. This move could involve both short-haul and long-haul growth, and so could involve a whole range of new aircraft. Let’s take a look at where Air Serbia could expand.

Air Serbia livery could soon be placed on a lot more aircraft. Photo: ERIC SALARD via flickr

The announcement

In a news conference on Wednesday discussing the impact of COVID-19 on the Serbian economy, the country’s Finance Minister Siniša Mali spoke about the impact of the pandemic on Serbia’s national airline.

Siniša Mali said he had met with Air Serbia’s representatives the day before. Here, he reiterated that Serbia would “definitely” help the carrier. He called the airline a “national symbol” of the country. After that, he said it would “definitely not go bankrupt”.

He then said that it is yet undecided how the government will help Air Serbia, but that it certainly will. He said discussions are taking place about specific business plans for the future, noting that acquiring new aircraft could be a good move now that airlines are struggling worldwide.

Earlier in May, Serbia’s Minister for Construction, Transport and Infrastructure, Zorana Mihajlović, announced Serbia is prepared to purchase all of Etihad’s 49% share in the airline. This way, Serbia would fully nationalize the company.

Air Serbia Airbus A330
Air Serbia could acquire another Airbus A330-200 for scheduled services to China. Photo: Getty Images

Siniša Mali also said that without Air Serbia, there would have been no way for the country to repatriate as many citizens as it did, including on one-off flights to Washington and Los Angeles. He also stressed that Air Serbia brought an extraordinary amount of cargo to Serbia, onboard its Airbus A330-200 flying back and forth from Belgrade to China.

What aircraft could Air Serbia get?

Air Serbia has been operating flights to Guangzhou or Shanghai almost daily for the whole of last month. In light of increasingly close diplomatic relations between China and Serbia, the airline could soon launch scheduled services from Belgrade to China.

Shanghai has been rumored as a new long-haul destination for Air Serbia for the last two years. The development of relations amid the COVID-19 pandemic could have been the final push this route needed to materialize.

At the same time, Air Serbia could be looking to expand its European network too. The airline launched 21 new routes last year and was on course to launch a further ten in 2020. The scale of the expansion was massive, and it came at a cost: a third of Air Serbia services were delayed last year, as Simple Flying reported in February.

Serbia and Russia have been in talks about a sale of Sukhoi SSJ100 aircraft to Air Serbia. Photo: SuperJet International – Sukhoi via Wikimedia Commons and Konstantin von Wedelstaedt via Wikimedia Commons

In March, it emerged that Serbia and Russia are resuming talks about the sale of Sukhoi SSJ100 aircraft to Air Serbia. This news was announced by Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister Yury Borisov.

Further requirements

Air Serbia would need new aircraft not only for any further network expansion but also to replace some of its existing units. The airline has one of the oldest fleets of any national airline in Europe. The average age of Air Serbia’s aircraft is 18 years, according to Airfleets. In its fleet are four Boeing 737 aircraft that are 34 years old. Additionally, there are six ATR 72 aircraft that are over 24 years old. Even its Airbus A319 and A320 aircraft are, on average, 18 years old.

Do you think Air Serbia will succeed in its intention to capture markets left vacant post-COVID-19? Let us know what you think in the comment section.

Source : Simple Flying More   

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