Whipped Ganache Frosting

This decadent Whipped Ganache is the easiest and tastiest Chocolate Frosting you will ever make. All you need to make this Whipped Chocolate Ganache Frosting is 2 ingredients, with no sugar and no butter! Why we love this recipe Making a decadent chocolate cream to top tarts and pastries or to fill a cake has... Read More The post Whipped Ganache Frosting appeared first on A Baking Journey.

Whipped Ganache Frosting

This decadent Whipped Ganache is the easiest and tastiest Chocolate Frosting you will ever make. All you need to make this Whipped Chocolate Ganache Frosting is 2 ingredients, with no sugar and no butter!

Whipped ganache piped inside a tall glass.
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Why we love this recipe

Making a decadent chocolate cream to top tarts and pastries or to fill a cake has never been so easy. This Whipped Chocolate Ganache Frosting (called "Ganache Montée in French) is made from two ingredients only!

This delicious Chocolate Frosting made with No Sugar and No Butter can be used in SO many ways, either as a filling or as a topping. It can replace any type of chocolate buttercream, frosting or icing.

Whipped Ganache holds its shape quite well as opposed to a Chocolate Pastry Cream that is a bit runnier, so it is always a great frosting option to decorate your sweet creations. And it has the most delicious and decadent chocolate flavour!

Ingredients

Ingredients on a round wooden board.

There are only two ingredients required to make this chocolate whipped cream, which is just awesome:

  • Chocolate: you can use any type of chocolate you want (dark, milk or white), but make sure it is cooking chocolate (or couverture chocolate). Using eating chocolate (like a chocolate bar) will usually result in a grainy, dense whipped ganache.
  • Cream: use a thickened/heavy cream, or any cream that has a fat content of at least 30%. With a lower percentage of fat, the cream will not whip.

Your whipped ganache frosting can also be flavoured with many other ingredients (especially when made with White Chocolate) like Vanilla or Coffee.

Whipped Ganache Ratio

The main difference between a classic Ganache and a Whipped Ganache is the ratio of chocolate to cream. A classic liquid ganache uses an equal amount of chocolate and cream. A whipped ganache has a higher content of cream than chocolate.

The ratio of chocolate to cream actually varies depending on the type of chocolate you use. The darker the chocolate, the more cream you will need:

  • Dark Chocolate: 1 part chocolate to 3 part Cream (100 grams of Chocolate for 300 ml of Cream for example)
  • Milk Chocolate: 1 part chocolate to 2,5 part Cream (100 grams of Chocolate for 250 ml of Cream)
  • White Chocolate: 1 part chocolate to 2,4 part Cream (100 grams of Chocolate for 240 ml of Cream)

Note that I always recommend using measurements in grams and ml like here for more accuracy and better results. Cups and spoons are often not precise enough.

Close up on the cream inside a glass.

How to make Whipped Chocolate Ganache

Making whipped ganache is as easy as making a classic chocolate ganache and a whipped cream.

  • Place the Chocolate in a heat-proof mixing bowl. If using a chocolate bar, chop it finely first. I used Couverture Chocolate Callets, but any cooking chocolate will do to.
  • Heat up the Cream in a small pot on the stove until it starts to simmer. Make sure it does not boil.
  • Photo 1: Once the Cream starts to simmer, pour about 2/3 of it over the chopped Chocolate (or chocolate chips/callets).
  • Photo 2: leave to melt for 2 to 3 minutes without touching it.
  • Photo 3: using a Spatula, stir the two ingredients together in a circular movement, starting from the centre of the bowl and slowly making your way to the edges of the bowl to create an emulsion. The ganache should start to come together once all the hot cream has been incorporated.
  • Photo 4: when you cannot see any cream anymore, add the rest of the hot cream over the melted chocolate and repeat the process. Note that if the cream has cooled down, you might need to re-heat it in order to properly finish melting the chocolate.
Process Shot Collage: making the ganache.
  • Photo 5: you should get a very smooth (and rather liquid) chocolate ganache. If you still see small bits of unmelted chocolate, you can finish melting it over a double boiler (bain-marie) or in the microwave in 15 seconds increments.
  • Photo 6: Cover with plastic wrap touching the surface of the cream and place in the fridge to cool down completely for at least 2 hours, or preferably overnight.
  • Photo 7: after having cooled down in the fridge, the ganache should have set, be thick and shiny.
  • Photo 8: using a hand-mixer (or in the bowl of a stand mixer), whip the very cold ganache on medium speed, slowly increasing to high. As soon as the ganache starts to stiffen, stop to check the consistency. Continue to whip if needed, but be aware that whipped ganache can over-whip very quickly. Only whip for a few seconds at the time until you get the desired consistency.

If not using straight away, cover again with plastic wrap and store in the fridge for up to 2 days. When ready to use, leave at room temperature for 5 to 10 minutes and loosen with a spatula or whisk so that it is easier to pipe.

Process Shot Collage: chilling and whipping the cream.

Tips & Troubleshooting

Tips:

  • The Ganache needs to be really cold to whip properly. It is always a good idea to prepare the cream the day before and leave it overnight in the fridge.
  • To cool down more quickly: use about half of the hot cream to melt the chocolate before adding the rest of the cream cold. Transfer into a shallow pan (like a brownie pan) to cool down more quickly.
  • Slightly under-whip the Ganache - it will hold better than you think! Whipped Ganache can split or over-whip very quickly, so only whip a few seconds at the time when the cream starts to thicken.
  • Instead of adding sugar or a sweetener for more sweetness, use a different type of chocolate. The highest percentage of cacao, the more bitter the ganache will be. Using a White or Milk Chocolate will result in a sweeter whipped chocolate ganache than Dark Chocolate.

Troubleshooting:

  • My Whipped Ganache Split: it usually happens when the emulsion (mixing water with a fat) fails. It is often due to a temperature issue, usually when melting the chocolate with the cream. You can try to save a split ganache by slowly re-melting it over a double-boiler / bain-marie while continuously mixing (note that it will only work before the ganache is whipped).
  • The frosting is grainy: that often happens when you over-whip the ganache. Cream will stiffen much quicker than egg whites, so you need to be very careful once the cream starts to thicken. Often stop to check the consistency and whip again for a few seconds at the time until you get the desired consistency. You can try to save a grainy ganache by adding a little bit more cream and whisk it again.
  • The Ganache is not holding: did you use the right ratio of cream to chocolate? Remember that you will need more or less cream depending on the type of chocolate you use. It could also be due to under-whipping the cream.
Ganache piped inside a Choux Bun.

Recipe FAQs

What is the different between Whipped Ganache and Chocolate Mousse?

Although quite similar in texture, chocolate mousse often uses Eggs as opposed to cream to create its airy texture. Whipped Ganache tends to be more stable than a chocolate mousse too, making it a great option for piping and decorating cakes.

Can I use any type of Chocolate?

Yes, you can use Dark, Milk or White Chocolate (see the different ingredient ratios above) as long as it is Cooking Chocolate (or couverture). An eating chocolate bar will not melt properly and/or re-solidify in the fridge, which will result in a grainy whipped ganache texture.

Read more about the different types of chocolate here.

Can I use any type of Cream?

The cream needs to have at least 30% fat content in order to whip, which is why we usually use Thickened / Heavy Cream. Never use a low-fat or light cream to make whipped ganache - it will remain liquid.

How to store Whipped Ganache

This chocolate frosting should be kept in the fridge. It will last for up to 2 days either whipped or un-whipped.

I do not recommend freezing this cream.

How to use this Chocolate Cream

  • As a Choux Buns or Choux au Craquelin Filling
  • As a Cake Frosting, like for this Chocolate Loaf Cake
  • To decorate a Chocolate Ganache Tart
  • Simply use it as a Eggless Chocolate Mousse!
Chocolate Frosting in a high glass surrounded by choux buns.

More Chocolate Desserts

  • Chocolate and Raspberry Brownies
  • Chocolate Beetroot Cake
  • Double Chocolate Bavarois Cake
  • Chocolate Cornflake Cakes
  • Easy Chocolate Brownie Bites
  • Double Chocolate Brownie Muffins
  • French Baked Chocolate Tart

Made this recipe? Leave a comment & rating below to let us know what you think and tag us on Instagram @abakingjourney to show us your creations!
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Recipe

Whipped ganache piped inside a tall glass.
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Whipped Chocolate Frosting

This decadent Whipped Ganache is the easiest Chocolate Frosting you will ever make. You only need 2 ingredients to make this Whipped Chocolate Ganache, with no sugar and no butter!
Course Dessert
Cuisine French
Diet Gluten Free, Vegetarian
Prep Time 15 minutes
Resting Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 15 minutes
Servings 2 cups (400 grams of whipped ganache)
Calories 518kcal
Author A Baking Journey

Ingredients

  • 100 gr (3,5 oz) Dark Cooking Chocolate (see notes below if using milk or white chocolate)
  • 300 ml (1 1/4 cup) Heavy / Thickened Cream (at least 30% fat content)

Instructions

  • Place the Cooking Chocolate in a heat-proof mixing bowl. If using a chocolate bar, finely chop it first.
  • Place the Cream in a small saucepan and turn on low heat. Bring to a simmer then remove from the stove (see note 1)
  • Pour about 2/3 of the hot cream over the Chocolate and leave to melt for 2 to 3 minutes without touching it. Then using a spatula, stir together in small circular movements starting from the centre of the bowl and slowly making your way towards the edges. You should get a thick ganache (see note 2).
  • Add the rest of the hot cream (see note 3) and stir again until all the chocolate has melted and the ganache is thin and shiny.
  • Cover with plastic wrap touching the surface of the ganache and place in the fridge to rest for at least 2 hours, preferably overnight. Once it is very cold, the ganache should have thickened and hardened.
  • Transfer into the bowl of your mixer and whip on medium speed, slowly increasing to high speed. Stop as soon as the cream starts to stiffen (see note 4). Use straight away or store in the fridge for up to two days (see note 5).

Notes

Disclaimer: I highly recommend using the measurements in grams and ml for more accuracy and a better result.
Yield: this recipe will make about 2 cups or 400 grams of Whipped Ganache. If you need more or less, simply use the 1:3 ratio (or the recommended ratio for the type of chocolate below) to increase or decrease the quantities.
Ingredients Note:
Chocolate: I used a 70% Dark Cooking Chocolate for this recipe, with a ratio of 1 chocolate to 3 cream. If using Milk or White Chocolate, the ratios are different:
  • Dark Chocolate: 100 grams of chocolate for 300ml of cream (1 part chocolate to 3 parts cream)
  • Milk Chocolate: 100 grams of chocolate for 250ml of cream (1 part chocolate to 2,5 parts cream)
  • White Chocolate: 100 grams of chocolate for 240ml of cream (1 part chocolate to 2,4 parts cream)
You need to use proper Cooking (or Baking) Chocolate or Couverture Chocolate - using eating chocolate will result in a grainy whipped ganache.
Cream: make sure the cream you use has a minimum fat content of 30%, or it will not whip.
Instruction Notes:
  1. Make sure the cream is not boiling or you might burn the chocolate.
  2. You will probably still have a few unmelted chunks of chocolate, it's normal.
  3. If the rest of the cream is not hot anymore, slightly reheat it before adding it to the chocolate. If you still have unmelted pieces of chocolate after adding all the hot cream, you can finish it over a double-boiler/bain-marie or in the microwave (no more than 15 seconds at the time to avoid burning the chocolate).
  4. It is very easy to over-whip the ganache as the cream will stiffen very quickly. I highly recommend stoping and checking the consistency as soon as the ganache seems to get stiff, then continue whipping for a few seconds at the time only if needed until you reach the desired consistency. It is better to under-whip than over-whip the ganache or it will become grainy.
  5. Take it out of the fridge for 5 to 10 minutes to get back to room temperature before using it or it will be too hard to pipe. You might want to slightly loosen the cream with a whisk before using it as well.

Nutrition

Calories: 518kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 56g | Saturated Fat: 35g | Cholesterol: 206mg | Sodium: 57mg | Potassium: 113mg | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 2205IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 98mg | Iron: 1mg

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