White House rhetoric ‘permits’ racist people

ANKARA, According to Anadolu news report, Speaking on the high-profile shooting of an unarmed black man in her state, a Democratic US mayor accused Trump administration “rhetoric” of effectively encouraging would-be racists. Calling the death of Ahmaud Arbery the “lynching of an African American man,” Keisha Lance Bottoms, the mayor of Georgia’s state capital Atlanta, …

White House rhetoric ‘permits’ racist people

ANKARA, According to Anadolu news report, Speaking on the high-profile shooting of an unarmed black man in her state, a Democratic US mayor accused Trump administration “rhetoric” of effectively encouraging would-be racists.

Calling the death of Ahmaud Arbery the “lynching of an African American man,” Keisha Lance Bottoms, the mayor of Georgia’s state capital Atlanta, that “With the rhetoric we hear coming out of the White House in so many ways, I think that many who are prone to being racist are given permission to do it in an overt way that we otherwise would not see in 2020.”

The Trump administration has long been accused of using racially charged language, from the president praising white supremacist demonstrators as “fine people” to his frequently branding black lawmakers as “low IQ.”

Bottomos also stressed that the US Justice Department should step in when local leaderships fails to prosecute appropriately across the country, as many believe happened after the killing of Arbery this February.

“But we don’t have that leadership at the top right now. It’s disheartening,” she added.

The mayor said she believes the arrests of two white men in the killing would not have been made if eyewitness footage of the shooting not surfaced.

“I think that’s absolutely the reason that they were charged,” she said. “I think had we not seen that video, I don’t believe that they would be charged.”

Bottoms also said that Arbery’s killing is a “bigger” issue that extends beyond the state of Georgia.

The white father and son accused of killing Arbery were charged with murder Thursday night after video of the Feb. 23 attack was posted online, sparking national outrage.

Gregory McMichael, 64, and his son Travis McMichael, 34, were taken into custody for the fatal shooting over two months after it transpired.

Asked during the interview to local media what can be done to ensure “justice is done and this doesn’t end up in a racial situation,” President Donald Trump said “justice getting done is the thing that solves that problem.”

“It’s in the hands of the governor, and I’m sure he’ll do the right thing. It could be something that we didn’t see on tape,” Trump said of Brian Kemp, the Republican governor of Georgia, where the shooting took place.

Kemp won the governor’s seat in late 2018 amid claims he had rigged the voting process to exclude African-America voters.

“It was a disturbing or troubling video, no question about that,” said Trump. “But they have very good law enforcement in the state of Georgia and I’m sure they’re going to come up with what happened.”

Arbery’s family maintains the former football player was out for a jog when he was confronted by the men and fatally shot.

Source : Voice of South Asia More   

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More than 500 contracted COVID-19, Bangladeshi nurses serve front line amid drawbacks

DHAKA, Bangladesh, Even as Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has directed authorities to ensure the safety of health workers, nurses in the country are squirming about getting low wages and long work hours. Like in other countries, while nurses in Bangladesh have also emerged as frontline combatants to fight the coronavirus or the COVID-19 pandemic, experts …

More than 500 contracted COVID-19, Bangladeshi nurses serve front line amid drawbacks

DHAKA, Bangladesh, Even as Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina has directed authorities to ensure the safety of health workers, nurses in the country are squirming about getting low wages and long work hours.

Like in other countries, while nurses in Bangladesh have also emerged as frontline combatants to fight the coronavirus or the COVID-19 pandemic, experts believe their low numbers are affecting the country’s health system.

On eve of the International Nurses Day that was observed on Tuesday coinciding the 200th birth anniversary of Florence Nightingale, health workers were demanding further recruitment of nurses, which is much below global standards.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) data, the country has only 3.06 nurses to provide services to every 10,000 population.

While nearly 50% of the global health workforce reportedly constitutes nurses and midwives, their number is even lesser than doctors in Bangladesh, with just 50,000 of them serving a population of 165 million.

Speaking to Anadolu Iqbal Hosen Sabuj, a nurse at Dhaka Medical College Hospital, the central point of public health services of all government hospitals in Bangladesh, said that as a class-two employee, a nurse earns approximately 30,000 Bangladeshi takas [$352] per month.

“We have no other income sources, unlike doctors who have other options. We have to deal directly with patients including coronavirus infected cases most of the time, more than even doctors,” Sabuj said.

He said that nurses have to spend more time with patients directly than doctors.

“It is even very tough to run our families modestly with this salary to match the rising prices of daily commodities,” he added.

Source : Voice of South Asia More   

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