Woolworths in Gardens Centre closed after staff member tests positive

Gardens Centre management said Woolworths will reopen for trade once it’s safe to do so. The safety of staff and customers are no-doubt a priority.

Woolworths in Gardens Centre closed after staff member tests positive

Woolworths in Gardens Centre in Cape Town has been temporarily closed after one of its staff members tested positive for COVID-19. 

Melvina Walters from Gardens Centre management said on Tuesday 5 May: “It has come to our attention that a Woolworth’s staff member tested positive for the COVID-19 virus and the store has been temporarily closed.” 

WOOLWORTHS CLOSED FOR DEEP CLEAN 

Centre management said the store is closed for forensic deep cleaning by specialists. All staff who have been in direct contact with the employee have also been placed in self-quarantine for 14 days. 

“This procedure is guided by the approach of the Department of Health and National Institute from Communicable Diseases. The [Woolworths] store will reopen for trade once it is safe to do so,” the statement read. 

“The health and safety of everyone visiting and working at the centre remains our primary focus as we fight the COVID-19 pandemic together. We have remained diligent in our cleaning processes and through our service providers, we have placed additional focus on key public areas such as hard surfaces, equipment and bathrooms throughout the centre,” it added. 

“We encourage our customers to continue to practice good personal hand, sneeze and cough hygiene, as it is key to preventing the spread of COVID-19,” it said. 

SUPERMARKETS PROVE TO BE COVID-19 HOTSPOT 

On 25 April — about 10 days ago — Western Cape Health MEC Nomafrench Mbombo said grocery shops were proving to be a fertile breeding ground for COVID-19.

This came after over 200 supermarket workers tested positive for the virus, now it includes Woolworths. Three shops closed temporarily after each having an employee test positive for COVID-19. The affected stores were in Kuils River near Cape Town, Somerset West and one in the Zevenwacht area.

The Shoprite Group also said, just last week, that 17 of its Western Cape stores had been hit by COVID-19.

Supermarkets have had to remain open during the lockdown as an essential service. The Western Cape health department has issued out protocols for store managers to follow in case an employee tests positive for COVID-19. The infected person is required to self-isolate, while everyone who has been in contact with them needs to be quarantined.

The next step is to suspend all activities in the workplace, while surfaces are disinfected. Woolworths seems to be following protocol. 

Source : The South African More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Here are all the popular Google Doodle games you can play right now

Google announced back in April that it would be reviving its most popular Google Doodle games. Here are all the games you can play as of today, 5 May.

Here are all the popular Google Doodle games you can play right now

Without most of the world’s population in lockdown or isolation, keeping boredom at bay has been a challenge. Watching rocket launches and ISS footage can only go so far. What you need now is the most popular Google Doodle games.

Google said in a statement in April that Doodle game series will be looking back at some fan-favourite games. So far, we’ve not been disappointed by the offering.

I’ve personally lost more hours to Coding for Carrots than I care to admit, but let’s move on… Here are some of the most popular Google Doodle games, and a bit of history to give perspective. We will update this article weekly.

Popular Google Doodle games: Fan-favourites

Coding for Carrots

Coding for Carrots was first released in 2017 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Logo, the first-ever programming language designed for use by children.

It introduces children to the world of Scratch programming, which the game is loosely based upon. Players advance by helping the bunny collect carrots by using coding techniques to connect blocks of computer code.

“With today’s Doodle – the first coding Doodle ever – we celebrate fifty years of coding languages for kids by “Coding for Carrots.” In the interactive Doodle, you program and help a furry friend across six levels in a quest to gather its favourite food by snapping together coding blocks.”

Cricket (or, CrickHit)

CrickHit was also released in 2017, to celebrate the same years ICC Champions Trophy which took place at the Oval. In this game, you play cricket, as a cricket.

It’s a relatively simple but be warned, you’re going to see hours of your life go down the bat. of the confusing English sport but it’s very addictive.

In addition, it was Google Doodle’s smallest interactive Doodle ever. The team made it mini on purpose so that everyone could enjoy the game; even those playing or slower mobile connections.

Fischinger

Fischinger was released in 2017 to celebrate the 117th birthday of Oskar Fischinger, the influential filmmaker and visual artist. The game lets you make music, and that already is a win in our books.

Rockmore

Rockmore was released some four years ago to celebrate violinist and foremost theremin performer, Clara Rockmore’s 105th birthday.

The game also lets you create music by moving your finger or mouse cursor over on-screen notes to create music on a virtual theremin.

Garden Gnomes

Garden Gnomes was released back in in 2018 to celebrate Garden Day in Germany, as well as the European nations love of gnomes.

All you have to do is fling a Garden Gnome from a trebuchet and compete in gaining the high scores. What’s not to like!

What is a Google Doodle game?

First up, what is a Google Doodle game, you ask? Google describes it as a “temporary alteration of the logo on Google’s homepage to mark a special occasion.

Moreover, the first-ever Google Doodle was designed in 1998 by Larry Page and Sergey Brin. The doodle was created to honour The Burning Man event in Black Rock City, Nevada.

Since then, Google Doodles were created consistently – by a team of people called Doodlers – to mark historical events. By 2019, the team created more than 4 000 doodles.

Also read – Google searches for ‘coronavirus helpers’ skyrocket amid lockdown

Source : The South African More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.