Yes, Leica’s New 24-70mm is Almost Certainly a Rehoused Sigma Art Lens

Leica recently announced that it would be bringing a 24-70mm f/2.8 to its first-party L-mount lens lineup, but there has been speculation that the lens is simply a rebranded Sigma Art optic. The main indicator that the lenses are very likely the same is that the construction of both the Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG DN […]

Yes, Leica’s New 24-70mm is Almost Certainly a Rehoused Sigma Art Lens

Leica recently announced that it would be bringing a 24-70mm f/2.8 to its first-party L-mount lens lineup, but there has been speculation that the lens is simply a rebranded Sigma Art optic.

The main indicator that the lenses are very likely the same is that the construction of both the Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG DN Art and the Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-70mm f/2.8 ASPH. share a lot in common.

According to official press materials provided by Leica, the Vario-Elmarit features 19 elements in 15 groups with three elements with aspherical surfaces on both sides — for a total of six aspherical surfaces — and an 11-bladed aperture diaphragm. This description is identical to those found on Sigma’s official specifications for its Art lens.

Additionally, when lens diagrams are compared, the two appear to have an identical construction.

Top: Leica official lens diagram. Bottom: Sigma official lens diagram.

In the Sigma diagram, the parts that are outlined in red denote the aspherical elements, which match up with the labeled aspherical elements on the Leica diagram.

In a conversation with PetaPixel, Leica noted that it has a strong relationship with its L-mount alliance partners and that the Vario-Elmarit-SL 24-70mm f/2.8 ASPH. is made in Japan, but stops short of specifically saying that it is a Sigma lens at its core.

That said, it’s hard to look at the technical specifications of both lenses and not walk away with the conclusion that they are identical. That said, Leica did make other changes to its iteration of the lens that differentiate it from the Sigma model.

For one, it uses an all-metal housing which may make it more resistant to the elements — weather resistance is a repeated theme of importance to Leica. Additionally, Leica removed all buttons and switches from the exterior of the lens — even the manual focus/autofocus switch — which means that can only be adjusted from the camera itself, but also may make for fewer weak points where moisture or dust could sneak in and damage the internals. Additionally, Leica’s lens hood is made of metal.

There are some other minor differences, too. While the Leica weighs more (no doubt due to the additional metal parts), Sigma states an 84.1 to 34.3-degree field of view while Leica states an 82.3 to 35.3-degree field of view. Leica also has published a 7.1-inch minimum focusing distance while Sigma states a 7.09-inch minimum focusing distance — minor, but different.

Leica also broadly states that all of its first-party lenses are better matches for one another even if the L-mount is shared among Panasonic, Sigma, and Leica. So while all the lenses in the L-mount alliance are compatible with one another, Leica contends that overall each of the brands’ optics will likely perform their best with a matching camera.

Even if Leica were to confirm that the two lenses are optically identical — which it doesn’t seem keen to do — it wouldn’t be out of character. Leica has worked with partners in the past to release new versions of what are basically re-housed versions of previously available products. For example, the V-Lux was a rehoused Panasonic FZ1000 and the D-Lux was a Leica rebrand of the Panasonic LX1000.

In the end, it might come down to aesthetics. The Leica might appeal to some more than the Sigma, at which point they will have to decide if the Leica is worth the additional $1,736 over the Sigma.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

What's Your Reaction?

like
0
dislike
0
love
0
funny
0
angry
0
sad
0
wow
0

Next Article

Zhiyun Launches the Three-Axis Smartphone Gimbal Smooth-Q3

Zhiyun-Tech — known for its consumer and professional stabilizer products for both cameras and smartphones such as the Crane-series camera gimbals — has announced the launch of its latest smartphone stabilizer Smooth-Q3. Smooth-Q3 is a consumer-marketed three-axis smartphone gimbal with a new compact design, compared to the older Smooth-Q2 model. The most notable new feature […]

Zhiyun Launches the Three-Axis Smartphone Gimbal Smooth-Q3

Zhiyun-Tech — known for its consumer and professional stabilizer products for both cameras and smartphones such as the Crane-series camera gimbals — has announced the launch of its latest smartphone stabilizer Smooth-Q3.

Smooth-Q3 is a consumer-marketed three-axis smartphone gimbal with a new compact design, compared to the older Smooth-Q2 model. The most notable new feature of this gimbal is the 4,300k warm-toned integrated fill light that has three levels of brightness adjustments and a touch button control for 180-degree front and rear lighting, which the brand claims is “perfect for capturing clear portrait images in low light setups” and enhances the user experience when filming content or doing a mobile live stream.

This stabilizer also works in conjunction with the ZY Cami app which brings several new features with the release of the Smooth-Q3, such as SMART templates and an advanced editor. The app allows users to speed up the creation of videos that are shot on regular basis, using built-in templates, and the videos can be edited to add music, special effects, and filters.

Additional new features include gesture control, SmartFollow 3.0 Object Tracking, an instant Dolly Zoom, and MagicClone Pano, which is operated using a single press trigger button to mark the target and activate smart following.

In comparison to its predecessor Smooth-Q2, the latest model is lighter at 340 grams (0.75 lbs) and easier to fold, but also boasts a higher maximum payload of 280 grams (0.62 lbs) compared to Smooth-Q2’s 260 grams (0.57 lbs). The Smooth-Q3 measures 45mm (1.8 inches) x 154mm (6.1 inches) x 180mm (7.1 inches).

The stabilizer is compatible with any smartphone models that are within the holder’s capable width and boasts 15 hours maximum battery run time and can charge from empty to 100% in three hours.

Zhiyun claims the new intuitive button layout leads to overall smoother operation, such as by triple tapping the trigger, a user can instantly switch between portrait and landscape modes. The gimbal also allows easy capture of ultra-wide-angle shots as well as low-angle shots.

The new model can be purchased on the Zhiyun store individually for $89 or as a $109 Smooth-Q3 combo, which includes Smooth-Q3, charging cable, tripod, protective bag, VIP card, and a wrist strap.

Source : Peta Pixel More   

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.